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OFFICIAL REGISTER OF 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



VOLUME XIV 



APRIL 28, 1917 



NO. 21 



THE 



DENTAL SCHOOL 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1917-18 




"""•'W/rajB 



-UMBil/W 



PUBLISHED BY HARVARD UNIVERSITY 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



OF THE 



DENTAL SCHOOL 



OF 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



1917-18 




CAMBRIDGE 
PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1917 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Calendar 2 

Dental School Calendar 5 

President and Fellows of Harvard College ........ 6 

Board of Overseers of Harvard College 7 

Departments of the University 9 

Administrative Officers 10 

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences 10 

Laboratories and Museums Associated with the Faculty of 

Arts and Sciences 11 

Other Faculties and Departments 12 

Faculty of Medicine 15 

Standing Committees 18 

General Statement .19 

Dental Building 20 

Administrative Board of the Dental School 20 

Instructors, Lecturers, and Assistants 20 

Massachusetts General Hospital Out-Patient Dental Clinic 24 

Admission by Certificate 25 

Dental Faculties Association 26 

Admission by Examinations 26 

General Regulations 27 

College Entrance Examination Board 27 

Partial List of Examination Centres • 29 

Studies in which Examinations are Held 30 

Registration 44 

Arrangement of Studies 45 

Methods of Instruction 46 

Dental and Physiological Chemistry 46 

Anatomy 47 

Comparative Anatomy and Biology 48 

Physiology 50 

Comparative Physiology 52 

Bacteriology 52 

Oral Anatomy, Oral Histology, and Pathology .... 53 

Operative Dentistry 54 

Prophylaxis and Pyorrhoea Alveolaris 56 

3 



4 

PAGE 

X-Rat Department 56 

Extraction and Anaesthesia 57 

Prosthetic Dentistry 58 

Crown and Bridge Work 59 

Orthodontia 60 

Inlay Work » 60 

Syphilology 61 

Surgery, Surgical Pathology, and Oral Surgery .... 61 

Operative Surgery 62 

Oral Hygiene 62 

Dental Pathology 62 

Materia Medica and Pharmacology 62 

Neurology 63 

Clinical Advantages 63 

Libraries and Museums 65 

Fellowships and Scholarships 66 

Harriet Newell Lowell Society for Dental Research ... 67 

Warren Museum 68 

Examinations 68 

Requirements for the Degree 69 

Instruments 70 

Fees and Expenses 70 

Stillman Infirmary Fee 72 

Payment of Fees . 72 

Tabular View 74 

Students in the Dental School ..•..• 82 

List of Graduates 89 



DENTAL SCHOOL CALENDAR 



1917. 



Sept, 12, 



Sept. 24, Monday, 



Oct, 12, 
Nov. 29, 



Friday. 
Thursday . 



Jan. 15, Tuesday. 



Wednesday. Examinations begin for applicants for advanced 

standing, and for men previously condi- 
tioned. 

Academic Year begins. Registration of 
Students. Payment of the first instalment 
of the tuition-fee is required on or before 
this date. 

Columbus Day : a holiday. 

Thanksgiving Day : a holiday. 

Recess from Dec. 23, 1917, to Jan. 2, 1918, inclusive. 

1918. 

Last day for receiving applications from stu- 
dents in the Professional Schools to be 
qualified for the degree of A.M. in 1918. 

Mid-year examinations begin. 

Payment of the second instalment of the tuition- 
fee is required on or before this date. 

Second half-year begins. 

Washington's Birthday : a holiday. 

Recess from April 14 to April 20, inclusive. 

1, Wednesday. Last day for receiving applications of candi- 
dates for the degree of D.M.D. in June, 
1918. 

May 30, Thursday. Memorial Day : a holiday. 

June 17-22, Monday to Saturday. Examinations for admission ^ — con- 
ducted by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

June 19, Wednesday. Alumni Day. 

June 20, Thursday. Commencenient. 

Summer Vacation, from Commencement Day to 
September 22, inclusive. 



Jan. 


28, 


Monday. 


Jan. 


31, 


Thursday . 


Feb. 


1, 


Friday. 


Feb. 


22, 


Friday. 



May 



THE PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF 
HARVARD COLLEGE 



This Board is commonly known as the Corporation. 



PRESIDENT 

ABBOTT LAWRENCE LOWELL, A.B., LL.B., LL.D., Ph.D. 

17 Quincy St., Cambridge 

FELLOWS 

HENRY PICKERING WALCOTT, A.B., M.D., LL.D. 

11 Waterhouse St., Cambridge 

HENRY LEE HIGGINSON, A.M., LL.D. 44 State St., Boston 

THOMAS NELSON PERKINS, A.B., LL.B. 60 State St., Boston 

ROBERT BACON, A.B., LL.D. 1 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

WILLIAM LAWRENCE, A.B., D.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

122 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 

TREASURER 

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, A.B., LL.B. 50 State St., Boston 

DEPUTY TREASURER 

GORHAM BROOKS, A.B. 50 State St., Boston 

SECRETARIES TO THE CORPORATION 

FRANCIS WELLES HUNNEWELL, 2d, A.B., LL.B. 

5 University Hall, Cambridge 

ROGER PIERCE, A.B. 5 University Hall, Cambridge 



e 



THE BOARD OF OVERSEERS 



The President and Treasurer of the University, ex officio, and the 
following persons by election : — 

1917* 

GEORGE VON LENGERKE MEYER, A.B., LL.D., President, Hamilton 
WILLIAM COWPER BOYDEN, A.B., LL.B. 

1130 Corn Exchange Bank Building, Chicago, 111. 
HENRY CABOT LODGE, Ph.D., LL.B., LL.D. Washington, D.C. 

LAWRENCE EUGENE SEXTON, A.B., LL.B. 

34 Pine St., New York, N.Y. 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, A.B. 115 Devonshire St.. Boston 

1918 

AUGUSTUS EVERETT WILLSON, A.M., LL.D. 

1423 Fourth St., Louisville. Ky. 
LOUIS ADAMS FROTHINGHAM, A.B., LL.B. 

911 Barristers Hall. Boston 
OWEN WISTER, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., L.H.D. 

1004 West End Trust Building, Philadelphia. Pa. 
FREDERIC ADRIAN DELANO, A.B. 

288 Treasury Building, Washington, D.C. 
THOMAS WILLIAM LAMONT. A.B. 23 Wall St., New York, N.Y. 

1919 

GEORGE HERBERT PALMER, A.M., LL.D., Litt.D., L.H.D. 

11 Quincy St. 
WILLIAM ROSCOE THAYER, A.M., LL.D., Litt.D., L.H.D. 

8 Berkeley St. 
FREDERICK CHEEVER SHATTUCK, A.M., M.D., LL.D., S.D. 

135 Marlborough St.. Boston 
LANGDON PARKER MARVIN, A.M., LL.B. 

52 Wall St.. New York. N.Y. 
FREDERICK PERRY FISH, A.B. 84 State St.. Boston 

• The term expires, in each case, on Commencement Day of the year indicated* 

7 



8 



1920 

WILLIAM CAMERON FORBES, A.B., LL.D. 

199 Washington St., Boston 

EVERT JANSEN WENDELL, A.B. 15 W. 38th St., New York, N.Y. 
THOMAS WILLIAMS SLOCUM, A.B. 11 Thomas St., New York, N.Y. 
JOHN WHITE HALLOWELL, A.B. Milton 

EDGAR CONWAY FELTON, A.B. Haverford, Pa. 

1921 

ROBERT GRANT, Ph.D., LL.B. 211 Bay State Road, Boston 

ROBERT FREDERICK HERRICK, A.B., LL.B. Ruggles Lane, Milton 

WILLIAM DeWITT HYDE, A.B., D.D., LL.D. Brunswick, Me. 

WILLIAM SYDNEY THAYER, A.B., M.D., LL.D. 

406 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 
DWIGHT FILLEY DAVIS, A.B., LL.B. 

16 Portland Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

1922 
HOWARD ELLIOTT, C.E. South Station, Boston 

JOHN PIERPONT MORGAN, A.B. 23 Wall St., New York, N.Y. 

WILLIAM THOMAS, A.B., LL.B. 310 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

FRANCIS LEE HIGGINSON, Jr., A.B. 44 State St., Boston 

ELIOT WADSWORTH, A.B. 1718 H St., Washington, D.C. 



SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF OVERSEERS 

WINTHROP HOWLAND WADE, A.M., LL.B. 99 State St.. Boston 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The University comprehends the following departments : — 

Harvard College, 

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 

Special Students, 

School of Architecture, 

School of Landscape Architecture, 

BussEY Institution, 

Engineering and Mining, 

Graduate School of Business Administration, 

Divinity School, 

Law School, 

Medical School, 

Dental School, 

Graduate School of Medicine, 

Arnold Arboretum, 

University Library, 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, 

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and 

Ethnology, 
University Museum, 
Botanic Garden, 
Gray Herbarium, 
Astronomical Observatory. 

g^^ Students in regular standing in any one department of the 
University are admitted free to the instruction and the examinations 
given in any other department, with the exception of exercises carried 
on in the special laboratories. But no student paying less than the 
full fee in his own department is admitted to exercises given in any 
other department, except upon payment of suitable fees therefor, and 
with the knowledge and consent of the Deans both of his department 
and of the department in which the additional instruction is given. 

a 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



THE UNIVERSITY 

President: Abbott Lawrence Lowell, a.b., ll.b., ll.d., ph.d. 

Office, 5 University Hall, Cambridge. 
Treasurer : Charles Francis Adams, a.b., ll.b. 
Deputy Treasurer : Gorham Brooks, a.b. 

The office of the Corporation (and of the Treasurer) is at 50 State 
Street, Boston. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. 

to 1 P.M. 

Secretaries to the f Francis Welles Hunnewell, 2d, a.b., ll.b. 
Corporation: I Roger Pierce, a.b. 
Office, 5 University Hall, Cambridge. 

Comptroller: Francis Welles Hunnewell, 2d, a.b., ll.b. 

Office, 5 University Hall, Cambridge. 
Assistant Comiptroller : John Lewis Taylor. 

Office, Dane Hall, Cambridge. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Bursar: Charles Frank Mason, a.b. 

Office, Dane Hall, Cambridge. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Inspector of Grounds and Buildings : Walter Safford Burke. 

Office, Massachusetts Hall, Cambridge. Office hours, daily, 9 a.m. 
to 12.30 P.M., and daily, except Saturday, 4 to 4.30 p.m. 
Regent: Edward Deshon Brandegee, a.b. 

Office, 31 Weld Hall, Cambridge. Office hours, daily, except Satur- 
day, 10 A.M. to 12 m. 
Professor of Hygiene: Roger Irving Lee, a.b., m.d. 

Office, 4 Weld Hall, Cambridge. Office hours, daily, 1.30 to 3 p.m. 

THE FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The Offices of this Faculty and of the Departiments under its charge at 
Nos. 2, 4, 10, 19, 20, 23 and 24, University Hall, Camhridge, are 
open on week-days from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nos, 2, 10, 19, 20, 23, and 
24 are also open on week-days, except Saturdays, from 2 to b p.m. 

Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences: Le Baron Russell Briggs, 
a.m., ll.d., litt.d. 
Office, 10 University Hall. Office hours, Monday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences : Charles Homer 

HaSKINS, PH.D., LITT.D., LL.D. 

Office, 23 University Hall. Office hours, daily, except Saturday, 

12 M. to 1.15 P.M. 

10 



11 

Dean of Harvard College: Henry Aaron Ykomans, a.m., ll.b. 

Office, 4 University Hall. Office hours, Monday, Wednesday, 3 to 5 
P.M.; Tuesday, Thursday, 9. 30 to 11.30am. ; Saturday, 11 a.m. -12m. 

Assistant Deans of Harvard College : 

Clarence Cook Little, a.b., s.m.zool., s.d. 

Office, 2 University Hall. Office hours, Wednesday and Friday, 
9 A.M. to 12 M. ; Tuesday 2 to 5 p.m. 
Lawrence Shaw Mayo, a.m. 

Office, 2 University Hall. Office hours, Monday, 2 to 5 p.m. ; 
Tuesday, Thursday, 9 a.m. to 12 m. 
Secretary of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Chairman of the Cotti- 
mittee on Admission : John Goddard Hart, a.m. 
Office, 20 University Hall. Office hours, daily, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Recoo'der of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences : George Washington 
Cram, a.b. 
Office, 4 University Hall. Office hours, daily, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Dean of Special Students and Dean in Charge of University Extension : 
James Hardy Ropes, a.b., d.d. 
Office, 19 University Hall. 
Director of the Summer School of Arts and Sciences : Kenneth Grant 
Tremayne Webster, ph.d. 
Office, 19 University Hall. 

Secretary of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences: George Wash- 
ington Robinson, a.b. 
Office, 24 University Hall. Office hours, daily, 10 a.m. to 12 m., 
and daily, except Saturday, 2 to 4 p.m. 
Secretary for Student Employment : Morris Gray, Jr., a.b. 

Office, 9 University Hall. Office hours, daily, 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 

LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE 
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Director of the Chemical Laboratory : Arthur Becket Lamb, ph.d. 
Assistant Director of the Chemical Laboratory: Willis Arnold 

BOUGHTON, A.B. 

The Chemical Laboratory is in Boylston Hall. 

Director of the Wolcott Gibbs Memorial Laboratory : Theodore William 
Richards, ph.d., s.d., ll.d., chem.d., m.d. 
The Wolcott Gibbs Memorial Laboratory is on Frisbie Place. 

Director of the Jefferson Physical Laboratory : Theodore Lyman, ph.d. 

Director of the Cruft High- Tension Engineering Laboratory: George 
Washington Pierce, Ph.D. 
The Jefferson Physical Laboratory and the Cruft Memorial Laboratory 
are on Holmes Field. 



12 

Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology : Samuel Henshaw, a.m. 

Honorary Curator of the Botanical Museum : George Lincoln Good- 
ale, M.D., LL.D. 

Curator of the Mineralogical Museum. : John Eliot Wolff, ph.d. 
Director of the Peahody Museum, of American Archaeology and Eth- 
nology: Charles Clark Willoughby, a.m. 
Secretary of the Peahody Museum, of American Archaeology and Eth- 
nology : Richard Francis Carroll. 
The above Museums are between Oxford Street and Divinity Avenue. 
Curator of the Semitic Museum: David Gordon Lyon, ph.d., d.d. 

The Semitic Museum is on Divinity Avenue. 
Curator of the Germanic Museum : Kuno Francke, ph.d., ll.d., litt. d. 
The Germanic Museum is at the corner of Kirkland Street and 
Divinity Avenue. 
Director of the William Hayes Fogg Museum of Art and Curator of the 
Gray Collection of Eng^^avings : Edvtard Waldo Forbes, a.b. 
Assistant Director of the William. Hayes Fogg Museum of A?^t: Paul 
Joseph Sachs, a.b. 
The Fogg Museum of Art is on Cambridge Street. 
Director of the Botanic Garden: Oakes Ames, a.m. 
Curator of the Gray Herbarium: Benjamin Lincoln Robinson, ph.d. 
The Herbarium and Botanic Garden are at the corner of Garden and 
Linnaean Streets. 

Director of the Harvard University Press : Charles Chester Lane, a.m. 
The Harvard University Press is in Randall Hall, corner of Kirkland 
Street and Divinity Avenue. 

OTHER FACULTIES AND DEPARTMENTS 

Dean of the Faculty of Architecture : Herbert Langford Warren, a.m. 

Office, Robinson Hall. 
Dean of the Graduate School of Business Administration : Edwin 
Francis Gay, ph.d. 

Office, 15 University Hall. Office hours, Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Saturday, 1L30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Dean of the Bussey Institution : William Morton Wheeler, ph.d., s.d. 

Office, Bussey Institution, Forest Hills. 
Dean of the Faculty of Divinity : William Wallace Fenn, a.m., d.d. 
Secretary of the Faculty of Divinity : Henry Wilder Foote, a.m., s.t.b. 

Office, Divinity Library, Cambridge. Office hours, Tuesday and 

Thursday, 9 to 11 a.m. ; Wednesday, 2.30 to 4.30 p.m. ; other times 

by appointment. 



13 

Dean of the Faculty of Law : Roscoe Pound, ph.d., ll.m., ll.d. 
Office, Langdell Hall, Cambridge. 

Secretary of the Faculty of Law : Richard Ames, a.b., ll.b. 

Office, Langdell Hall, Cambridge. Office hours, daily, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Librarian of the Law School: Edward Brinley Adams, a.b., ll.b. 
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine: "^ Edward Hickling Bradford, a.m., 
Dean of the Medical School: / m.d. 

Office, Harvard Medical School, Longwood Avenue, Boston. Office 
hours, by appointment. 

Secretary of the Faculty of Medicine : Francis Winslow Palfrey, 
A.B., m.d. 
Office, Harvard Medical School, Longwood Avenue, Boston. Office 
hours, Tuesday, 4to 5 p.m. 

Dean of the Graduate School of Medicine : Alexander Swanson Begg, 
m.d. 
Office, Harvard Medical School. Office hours, Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, 4 to 5 p.m. 

Director of the Graduate School of Medicine : Horace David Arnold, 

A.B., M.D. 

Office, Harvard Medical School. Office hours, by appointment. 
Secretary of the Graduate School of Medicine : Lewis Webb Hill, 

A.M., M.D. 

Office, Harvard Medical School. Office hours, Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 12 m. to 1 p.m. ; Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 3 p.m. 

Dean of the Dental School: Eugene Hanes Smith, d.m.d. 

Office, Harvard Dental School, Longwood Avenue, Boston. Office 
hours, 2 to 5 p.m., daily except Saturdays, and by appointment. 

Secretary to the Dean and Chief Clerk of the School: Florence M. Lane. 
Office, Harvard Dental School, Longwood Avenue, Boston. Office 
hours, daily, 9 a.m. to 1p.m.; 2 to 5p.m., except Saturdays; 
Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 12 m. 

Curator of the Dental Museum and Librarian : Waldo Elias Board- 
man, d.m.d. 
Museum and Library are in the Dental School Building, Longwood 
Avenue; Office of the Curator and Librarian, 419 Boylston St., 
Boston. 

Director of the Arnold Arboretum: Charles Sprague Sargent, a.b., 

LL.D. 

The Arnold Arboretum is in Jamaica Plain. The nearest railway 
and telegraph station is Forest Hills, on the Boston and Providence 
Division of the N.Y., N.H., and Hartford Railroad. 



14 

Director of the Astronomical Observatory : Edward Charles Picker- 
ing, LL.D., S.D. 

The Observatory is at the corner of Garden and Bond Streets, 
Cambridge. 

Director of the Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory : Alexander 
George McAdie, a.m., s.m. 
The Blue Hill Observatory is in Readville, Mass. 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE* 

ADDRESS, t 

ABBOTT LAWRENCE LOWELL, LL.B., LL.D., 

Ph.D., President, 17 Quincy St., Cambridge. 

EDWARD H. BRADFORD, M.D., Dean, 133 Newbury St. 

CHARLES A. BRACKETT, D.M.D., Professor of 

Dental Pathology^ Newport, R.I. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Professor of Clinical 

Dentistry^ and Dean of the Dental School^ 283 Dartmouth St. 

WILLIAM F. WHITNEY, M.D., John Barnard Swett 
Jackson Curator of the Warren Anatomical Museum, 

Harvard Medical School. 

WILLIAM T. COUNCILMAN, M.D., A.M., LL.D., 

Shattuck Professor of Pathological Anatomy, 78 Bay State Road. 

GEORGE H. MONKS, M.D., M.R.C.S., Professor of 

Oral Surgery, 67 Marlborough St. 

HAROLD C. ERNST, M.D., A.M., Prof essor of Bacteri- 
ology, Harvard Medical School. 

WILLIAM H. POTTER, D.M.D., Professor of Opera- 
tive Dentistry, 16 Arlington St. 

GEORGE G. SEARS, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medi- 
cine, 426 Beacon St. 

WILLIAM P. COOKE, D.M.D., Professor of Prosthetic 

Dentistry, 520 Beacon St. 

ALGERNON COOLIDGE, M.D., Professor of Laryn- 
gology, 613 Beacon St. 

ROBERT W. LOVETT, M.D., John B. and Buckmin- 
ster Brown Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, 234 Marlborough St. 

WILLIAM T. PORTER, M.D., LL.D., S.D., Professor 

of Comparative Physiology, Dover. 

ELLIOTT G. BRACKETT, M.D., Assistant Professor 

of Orthopedic Surgery, 116 Newbury St. 

* Arranged, with the exception of the President and Dean, on the basis of collegiate 
seniority. 
I The address is Boston, unless otherwise stated. 

15 



16 

CHARLES L. SCUDDER, M.D., Assistant Professor 

of Surgery, 209 Beacon St. 

PAUL THORNDIKE, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Genito- Urinary Surgery, 24 Marlborough St. 

HORACE D. ARNOLD, M.D., Director of the Gradu- 
ate School of Medicine, 520 Commonwealth Ave. 

MILTON J. ROSENAU, M. T>., A.M., Professor of Pre- 
ventive Medicine and Hygiene, 65 Naples Road, Brookline. 

FRANK B. MALLORY, M.D., Associate Professor of 

Pathology, Harvard Medical School. 

EDWARD H. NICHOLS, M.D., Clinical Professor of 

Surgery, 294 Marlborough St. 

J. BAPST BLAKE, M.B., Assistant Professor of Sur- 
gery, 657 Boylston St. 

EUGENE A. CROCKETT, M.D., Assistant Professor 

of Otology, 298 Marlborough St. 

HOWARD A. LOTHROP, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Surgery, 101 Beacon St. 

JOHN L. MORSE, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, 70 Bay State Road. 

ALEXANDER QUACKENBOSS, M.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Ophthalmology , 143 Newbury St. 

CHARLES A. PORTER, M.D., Clinical Professor of 

Surgery, 254 Beacon St. 

EDWARD W. TAYLOR, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Neurology, 457 Marlborough St. 

RICHARD C. CABOT, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Medicine, 1 Marlborough St. 

JAMES S. STONE, M.D., Instructor in Surgery, 

234 Marlborough St. 

DAVID L. EDSALL, M.D., S.T>., Jackson Professor of 

Clinical Medicine, 80 Marlborough St. 

ELLIOTT P. JOSLIN, M.D., A.M., Assistant Professor 

of Medicine, 81 Bay State Road. 

C. MORTON SMITH, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Syphilology, 437 Marlborough St. 

CHARLES J. WHITE, M.D., Edward Wigglesworth 

Professor of Dermatology, 259 Marlborough St. 

JAMES H. WRIGRT, M.B., S.T>., Assistant Professor 

of Pathology, Mass. General Hospital. 

HARVEY GUSHING, M.D., S.D., F.R.C.S., Moseley 

Professor of Surgery, 305 Walnut St., Brookline. 



17 

WILLIAM P. GRAVES, M.D., Professor of Gynae- 
cology, 244 Marlborough St. 

REID HUNT, M.T>., Professor of Pharmacology, 

Harvard Medical School. 

WILLIAM H. ROBEY, Jr., M.T> ., Instructor in Medi- 
cine, 202 Commonwealth Ave. 

OTTO FOLIN, Ph.D., S.D., Hamilton Kuhn Professor 

of Biological Chem^istry, ^ Harvard Medical School. 

ROBERT B. GREENOUGH, M.D.,^55t52fan25Pro/(j55or 

of Surgery, 10 Gloucester St. 

HARRIS P. MOSHER, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Laryngology, 828 Beacon St. 

FRANKLIN S. NEWELL, M.D., Assistant Professor 

of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 443 Beacon St. 

WILLIAM H. ^M.VTB.,M.T>., Instructor in Medicine, 10 Gloucester St. 

RICHARD P. STRONG, M.D., S.D., Professor of Trop- 
ical Medicine, Harvard Medical School. 

HUGH CABOT, M.D., Assistant Professor of Genito- 
urinary Surgery, 87 Marlborough St. 

GEORGE B. MAGRATH, M.D., Instructor in Legal 

Medicine, 274 Boylston St. 

HENRY A. CHRISTIAN, M.D., Hersey Professor of 

the Theory and Practice of Physic, 252 Marlborough St. 

FREDERICK H. VERHOEFF, M.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Ophthalmic Research, 5 Euston St., Brookline. 

JOHN L. BREMER, M.D., Associate Professor of His- 
tology, 295 Marlborough St. 

WALTER B. CANNON, M.D., George Higginson Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, Harvard Medical School. 

CHARLES H. DUNN, M.T>., Instructor in Pediatrics, 

178 Marlborough St. 

EDWARD A. LOCKE, M.D., Instructor in Medicine, 311 Beacon St. 

JOHN WARREN, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy, 

Harvard Medical School. 
HERMAN M. ADLER, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Psychiatry, 74 Fenwood Road. 

DAVID CHEEVER, M.D., Assistant Professor of Sur- 
gical Anatomy, 20 Hereford St. 

FREDERIC T. LEWIS, M.D., Associate Professor of 

Emhryology, Harvard Medical School. 

FREDERICK T. LORD, M.D., Instructor in Medicitie, 305 Beacon St. 
ELMER E. SOUTHARD, M.D., A.M., Bullard Pro- 
fessor of Neuropathology, 70 Francis Ave., Cambridge. 



18 

PERCY G. STILES, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Physiology, 19 Proctor St., Newtonville. 

ERNEST E. TYZZER, M.D., George Fahyan Professor 

of Comparative Pathology, Harvard Medical School. 

LAWRENCE J. HENDERSON, M.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Biological Chemistry, Harvard Medical School. 

S. BURT WOLBACH, M.D., Associate Professor of 

Pathology and Bacteriology, Harvard Medical School. 

MARSHAL FABYAN, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Comparative Pathology, Harvard Medical School. 

WORTH HALE, M.D., Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macology, 60 Wendell St., Cambridge. 

EDWIN H. PLACE, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Pediatrics, 745 Massachusetts Ave. 

FRITZ B. TALBOT, M.T>., Instructor in Pediatrics, 

100 Cottage Farm Road, Brookline. 

WALTER R. BLOOR, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Biological Chemistry , Harvard Medical School. 

CHANNING FROTHINGHAM, Jr., M.D., Instructor 
in Medicine, 395 Marlborough St. 

ALEXANDER S. BEGG, M.D., Dean of the Graduate 
School of Medicine, and Instructor in Comparative 
Anatomy, Harvard Medical School. 

FRANCIS W. PEABODY, M.D., Assistant Professor of 

Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 

ALEXANDER FORBES, M.D., Instructor in Physi- 
ology, Milton. 

CECIL K. DRINKER, U.J)., Instructor in Physiology, 

Harvard Medical School. 

FRANCIS W. PALFREY, M.D., Secretary of the Fac- _ 

ulty of Medicine, and Instructor in Medicine, 80 Marlborough St. 

STANDING COMMITTEES FOR THE DENTAL SCHOOL 

Building. — Dr. Cooke {Chairman), Dr. E. H. Smith. 

Courses of Study. — Dr. Smith (^Chairman), Drs. Potter and Cooke. 



Students^ Aid. — Any student vrho needs assistance, pecuniary or other, 
may consult Dr. Franklin Dexter, Director of Scholarships in the Medical 
School. Appointments may be made by calling at the Harvard Medical 
School, Building D386, Mondays, from 2 to 3.30 p.m. 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Harvard Dental School is established in Boston and was instituted 
by vote of the President and Eellows of Harvard College, July 17, 1867. 
The first session of the School opened on the first Wednesday in 
November, 1867, and continued until the following March. The first 
examination of candidates for the degree of the School was held March 6, 
1869. 

Instruction in this School is given throughout the academic year, by 
lectures, recitations, clinical teaching, and practical exercises, uniformly 
distributed. The programme of instruction is progressive, and occupies 
four years, its extension to four years having taken place this year. 

Biology, anatomy, histology, physiology, physiological and dental chem- 
istry, general pathology, oral anatomy, histology (normal and patho- 
logical), and bacteriology are pursued in the Harvard Medical School. 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine is given, on recommendation 
by the Faculty of Medicine, on the completion of the four years' course. 
The degree is given in two grades. 

It is the object of the Faculty to present a complete course of instruc- 
tion in the theory and practice of Dentistry ; and for this purpose a well- 
appointed laboratory and infirmary are provided. Clinical instruction is 
given by the professors and other instructors ; and each day patients are 
assigned to the students, ensuring to all the opportunity of operating at 
the chair, and becoming trained by actual practice in all the operations 
demanded of the dentist. 

Students have access to the hospitals of the city, and are assigned to 
service in the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

The Administrative Board reserves the right to require the withdrawal 
of any student at any time whenever, in the opinion of the Board, it is 
manifest that he is incompetent for his work or for any reason he is un- 
fitted to continue the course. 



19 



20 



THE DENTAL BUILDING 

In September, 1909, the Dental School moved to its new building, at 
the corner of Longwood Avenue and Wigglesworth Street. This building 
has the latest hospital equipment and is used solely for hospital purposes. 
It contains a commodious infirmary, three operating rooms for oral sur- 
gery with connecting wards, prosthetic laboratory, office of administration, 
library, museum, students' room and reception room. 

It is connected by a subway with the Harvard Medical School buildings 
where all lectures are given. 

ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, and Pro/e55or o/ Clinical Den- 
tistry. 

CHARLES A. ^UKCKWIT, T>.M.T>., Professor of Dental Pathology. 

GEORGE H. MONKS, M.D., M.R.C.S., Professor of Oral Surgery. 

WILLIAM H. POTTER, T>M.T>., Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

WILLIAM P. COOKE, D.M.D., Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry. 

AMOS I. HADLEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 

SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

GEORGE H. WRIGHT, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Hygiene. 

LEROY M. S. MINER, D.M.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery. 

INSTRUCTORS, LECTURERS, AND ASSISTANTS 

ALBERT B. JEWELL, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
FORREST G. EDDY, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Den- 
tistry. 
FRANK PERRIN, D.M.T)..^ Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

EDWIN C. BLAISDELL, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Dentistry. 
NED A. STANLEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
JERE E. STANTON, D.M.D., Lecturer on Dental Materia Medica and 

Therapeutics. 
JAMES SHEPHERD, T>.M..T>.^ Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

WALTER I. BRIGHAM, D.D.S., Instructor in Crown and Bridge 

Work, 
THOMAS W. WOOD, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
BENJAMIN H. CODMAN, T>.M.T>., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
ARTHUR W. ELDRED, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
ARTHUR J. OLDHAM, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 



21 

JOHN BAPST BLAKE, M.D., Instructor in Surgery, 

FRANK T. TAYLOR, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

AMOS I. HADLEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 

JOSEPH T. PAUL, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

EDAVARD W. TAYLOR, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

H. CARLTON SMITH, Ph.G., Lecturer on Dental Chemistry. 

FRED M. RICE, A.M., Inst^^uctor in Chemistry. 

C. MORTON SMITH, M.D., Instructor in Syphilology. 

HARRY S. PARSONS, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

THOMAS B. HAYDEN, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge 
Work. 

JAMES A. FURFEY, D.M.D., Clinical Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry. 

ASHER H. St.C. CHASE, D.M.D., Inst^^uctor in Operative Dentistry. 

EDWIN L. FARRINGTON, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and 
Anaesthesia. 

ADELBERT FERNALD, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 

CHARLES E. PARKHURST, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry. 

CLARENCE B. VAUGHAN, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
* LAWRENCE W. BAKEU, J). M.B., Assistant Professor of Orthodontia. 

CHARLES B. BURNHAM, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

HORACE L. HOWE, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 

WILLIAM D. SQUAREBRIGS, T>. M.B., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

JOHN T. TIMLIN, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

OLIVER P. WOLFE, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaes- 
thesia. 

ERNEST E. CARLE, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

ARTHUR A. LIBBY, D.M.D., Insti'uctor in Operative Dentistry. 

NORMAN B. NESBETT, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 

EDWARD P. WHITE, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

DAVID F. SPINNEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

CHARLES A. JAMESON, D.M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

CLARENCE M. GLAZIER, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

DENNIS J. HURLEY, Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

ALBERT I. MACKINTOSH, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry. 

LESLIE H. NAYLOR, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

WALTER A. DAVIS, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

WILSON C. DORT, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

HUGH K. HATFIELD, M.D., D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia, 



22 

JAMES E. HEAP, T). J). ^.^ Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

ALBERT L. MIDGLEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaes- 
thesia. 

WALTER C. MINER, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 

CHARLES G. PIKE, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

WALTER N. ROBERTS, D.M.D., Assista?it in Crown and Bridge 
Work. 

FRANK R. McCULLAGH, D.M.D., Instonictor in Operative Dentistry. 

CHARLES T. WARNER, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 

MARTIN B. DILL, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Operative Den- 
tistry. 

HENRY GILMAN, D.M.D., Instructor in Operdtive Dentistry. 

HERBERT F. LANGLEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

WILLIAM B. ROGERS, T>.M.T)., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

HARRY A. STONE, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

WILLIAM H. WESTON, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

GEORGE H. WRIGHT, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Hygiene. 

RAYMOND B. CARTER, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

HARRY S. CLARK, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

NATHAN A. ESTES, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

JULIUS F. HOVESTAD, D.M.D., Lecturer on Crown and Bridge 
Work. 

LEON J. LAWTON, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

LEROY M. S. MINER, D.M.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery. 

UBERT C. RUSSELL, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

EUGENE B. WYMAN, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

ROBERT S. CATHERON, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

EARLE C. CUMMINGS, T>.M..T>., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

ALBERT HERDER, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaes- 
thesia. 

VARAZTAD H. KAZANJIAN, D.M.D., Demonstrator of Prosthetic 
Dentistry. 

J. WILLIAM O'CONNELL, D.M.D., Lecturer on Materia Medica, and 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

WALTER F. PRO VAN, D.M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

W. VERNON RYDER, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

CHARLES E. STEVENS, D M.J)., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 

HORATIO LeS. A1^T>^WN^,T>.M.T>., Instructor in Crown and Bridge 
Work . 

FRED A. BECKFORD, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

ARTHUR S. CROWLEY, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 



23 

EDWARD H. LOOMER, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry, 
HAROLD B. NORWOOD, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and 

Anaesthesia. 
MAURICE E. PETERS, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge 

Wo7^k. 
JUDSON C. SLACK, 'D.M.'D., Inst7'uctor in Operative Dentistry. 

ERNEST V. L. WHITCHURCH, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative 

Dentistry . 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

ERNEST S. CALDER, T>M.T>., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

GUY E. FLAGG, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work. 

SIMON MYERSON, J). M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

JOSEPH A. RING, D.M.D., Insti^uctor in Extracting and Anaesthesia, 

CARL E. SAFFORD, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

CLARENCE SHANNON, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

ROGER B. TAFT, D.M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

NELS H. MALMSTROM, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

FREDERICK J. SULLIVAN, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Den- 
tisti'y. 

CHARLES S. EMERSON, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
KURT H. THOMA, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Histology and Pathology. 
ADOLPH GAUM, jy.M.T)., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

FREDERICK W. HOVESTAD, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and 

Bridge Work. 
WILLIAM G. JEWETT, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

LAWRENCE E. McGOURTY, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry. 

NISHAN DER S. TASHJIAN, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Den- 
tistry. 

THOMAS J. GIBLIN, Jr., D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

RALPH E. GOVE, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 

ALLAN W. LORD, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

STERLING N. LOVELAND, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Den- 
tistry. 
STEPHEN P. MALLETT, B.M.T)., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
GEORGE F. MARSH, Jr., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
HARRY Y. NUTTER, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
STUART R. HAYMAN, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
ERNEST L. LOCKWOOD, J). U.T>., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
J. MARK SMITH, D.M.D., Assistant in Extracting and Anaesthesia. 
RAYMOND L. WEBSTER, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 



24 

FKEDERICK C. THOMSON, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Den 
tistry. 

W. IRVING ASHLAND, D.M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

RALPH B. ED SON, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 

NORMAN ELLARD, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

CHARLES W. GOETZ, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

STUART H. YAUGHAN, D.M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

WALTER E. WADE, D.M.T>., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

G. BRICKETT BLAISDELL, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Den- 
tistry. 

FRED R. BLUMENTHAL, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia. 

CLEOPHAS P. BONIN, D. M.S., Assistant in Orthodontia. 

ARTHUR L. CAYANAGH, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

WALTER H. CHAMBERS, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 

RALPH C. CURTIS, D.M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

FRANK H. CUSHMAN, T>.M.T>., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

FRANK H. LESLIE, J). M..T>.., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

C. YICTOR JOHNSTON, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 

SIMON DeS. Mccarty, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

HABIB Y. RIHAN, D.M.D., Assistant in P7'osihetic Dentistry. 

CLARENCE J. SMITH, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 

FRANCIS J. TERRA, D.M.D. , Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

ELLMORE L. WALLACE, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 

FREDERICK F. FURFEY, D.M.D., Fellow in Anatomy . 

HAROLD L. PEACOCK, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia. 

CLARENCE G. SEYERY, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia, and 
Fellow in Anatomy. 

BENJAMIN S. STEYENS, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL OUT-PATIENT 

DENTAL CLINIC 

HENRY J. SKINNER, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
WILLIAM W. ANTHONY, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
CHARLES W. RINGER, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
F. CHESTER DURANT, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
FREDERICK F. FURFEY, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
WILLIAM H. GULLIFER, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
PHILIP H. MacINNIS, D.M^D.^ Assistant in Operative Dentistry, 



25 



ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

All candidates for admission holding a degree in letters, science, or 
medicine, from a recognized college or scientific school, or who have 
passed an examination for admission to Harvard College or any other 
reputable college of letters are admitted without examination. All can- 
didates who have passed the examinations of a four years' course in a 
reputable high school* are admitted without examinations. All other 
candidates must pass an examination. 

All candidates are required to satisfy the Administrative Board that 
they have had a course in Theoretical and Descriptive (Inorganic) Chem- 
istry sufficient to fit them to pursue the courses in Chemistry given at the 
School, or, failing in this, to pass an examination in General Chemistry, f 

A certificate of having passed the examination for admission will admit 
a student to this School only so long as the entrance requirements remain 
the same. 

The entrance and first-year examinations will be allowed to foreign 
students who have passed equivalent examinations abroad, upon presen- 
tation of proper certificates from the examining boards, vouching for the 
facts. 

Students who have had a preliminary training equivalent to the require- 
ments for admission to this School and who began their professional 
studies in other recognized dental or medical schools may be admitted 
to advanced standing ; but all persons who apply for admission to the 
advanced classes must furnish a satisfactory certificate of time spent in 
dental or medical studies, and must pass examinations in the branches 
already pursued by the class to which they seek admittance. 

Graduates of recognized dental schools and reputable practitioners of 
dentistry who have never received a degree will be admitted without 
examination to the courses in Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry, but 
attendance on such courses does not entitle a student to examination for 
the degree. A certificate of attendance will be furnished when desired. 

In order thai the time of study may count as a full year, students of 
all classes must present themselves within the first week of the academic 
year and register their names with the Dean. 

* The course must have included the subjects which we require for entrance, or their 
equivalents. See page 26. The grade attained in these subjects will be considered in 
each case. 

t Special arrangements may be made for making up this condition in September 
previous to entering the School. 



26 



DENTAL FACULTIES ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN 

UNIVERSITIES 

The schools holding membership in this Association are the Thomas W. 
Evans Museum and Dental Institute School of Dentistry, University of 
Pennsylvania; University of Michigan, School of Dentistry; University 
of Iowa, School of Dentistry ; University of Minnesota, School of Den- 
tistry ; University of California, School of Dentistry ; Washington Uni- 
versity Dental School, St. Louis, Mo. ; Harvard University Dental School. 

Applicants for advanced standing who have attended any of the above 
schools will be given credit for examinations passed in those schools. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations for admission to the Harvard Dental School will be held 
in the following subjects. Each candidate must offer studies amounting 
to 16J points. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 are required. Electives may be 
chosen from Section 6. 

The figure attached to each study indicates the relative weight (termed 
points) which will be given to it in determining the question of the can- 
didate's fitness for admission. 

1. English (3) 

2. Physics (i) 

3. Latin (3) 

or French (2) or German (J2) or Spanish (2) 
and Ancient History (i), Mediaeval and Modern History {T) 
or English History {1) 

4. Theoretical and Descriptive (Inorganic) Chemistry {!) 

5. Algebra (14) 

In addition he will be obliged to offer a sufficient number of subjects 
chosen from the list below to make up tlie total of 164 units required. 

6. Advanced Latin (i) Biology (i), 

Advanced French (i) or Botany (4), or Zoology (4) 

Advanced German (2) Geography (4) 

Advanced Algebra (4) American History (4) 

Plane Geometry (i) Civil Government (4) 

Solid Geometry (4) Freehand Drawing (4) 
Logarithms and Trigonom- Mechanical Drawing (4) 

etry (4) 

The examination in Theoretical and Descriptive (Inorganic) Chemistry 
will be given at the Harvard Dental School. 



r 



27 



GENERAL REGULATIONS EOR EXAMINATIONS 

Beginning with June, 1916, all examinations for admission will be con- 
ducted by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Registration and Fees for Board Examinations. — Every candidate for 
examination in June, 1917, in any one or more of the subjects in which 
examinations are offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, is 
required to file a formal application with the Secretary of the College En- 
trance Examination Board, 431 West llTth St., New York, N.Y. The 
blank form for this application, which will be ready for distribution in 
January, will be mailed to any teacher or candidate on request. A speci- 
men of the candidate's handwriting will form a necessary part of the 
application . 

If the application is received sufficiently early the examination fee will 
be $5.00 for candidates examined in the United States and Canada, and 
$15.00 for candidates examined outside of the United States and Canada. 
The fee, which must accompany the application, should be remitted by 
postal order, express order, or draft on New York to the order of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. 

The applications and fees of candidates who wish to he exami?ied out- 
side of the United States and Canada must reach the Secretary of the 
Board at least fire weeks in advance of the first day of the examinations^ 
that is^ on or before Monday^ 3Iay 14^ 1917 . 

The applications and fees of candidates who wish to he examined in the 
United States at points west of the Mississippi River ^ or in Canada., 
must he received at least three weeks %n advance of the examiiiations^ that 
is, on or hefore Monday, May 28^ 1917. 

The applications and fees of candidates who wish to he examined in the 
United States at points east of the 3Iississippi River or on the Mississippi 
River Tnust he received at least two weeks in adva?ice of the first day of the 
examination^ that is, on or hefore 3Ionday, June 4, 1917- 

When the candidate has failed to obtain the required blank form of 
application for examination the usual examination fee will be accepted if 
the fee arrive not later than the specified date, accompanied by a memo- 
randum containing the name and address of the candidate, the exact ex- 
amination centre selected, and a list of all the subjects in which he may 
have occasion to take the Board's examinations. 

In order to facilitate the making of arrangements for the proper con- 
duct of the examinations, it is desired that all applications be filed as early 
as possible. 

It is particularly requested that in every case where a teacher files an 
application for a pupil the application be explained to the pupil so that 



28 

the latter may understand exactly what subjects he is to offer at the exam- 
inations. 

The fee must be paid by all applicants, whether they intend to present 
themselves for examination in one subject or in several subjects. 

A candidate for examination in two or more successive years will be 
required to pay an examination fee each year. 

Belated Applications. — Applications received later than the dates 
named in the preceding article will be accepted when it is possible to 
arrange for the admission of the candidates concerned, hut only upon the 
payment of five dollars in addition to the regular fee. 

Receipt for Fee. — Upon receiving the examination fee the Secretary 
will mail to the candidate an acknowledgment authorizing the candidate 
to take the Board's examinations. This receipt must be preserved by the 
candidate and exhibited, but not surrendered, to the local Supervisor in 
immediate charge of the conduct of the examinations as evidence of his 
right to be admitted to the same. 

Should the candidate lose the receipt for his examination fee, or for any 
reason desire the issue of a duplicate receipt, a charge of twenty-five cents 
will be made for the issue of such duplicate receipt. 

Return of Fees. — The fees of candidates for examination in June, 1917, 
whose applications have been accepted by the Secretary, can under no 
circumstances be returned unless the request for their return is received 
on or before Monday, June 11, 1917. 

Division of Examinations. — A candidate for admission under the Old 
Plan may divide his examinations among several examination periods. If 
he takes any examinations one year or more before the year in which he 
completes his admission record, he is known as a '' Preliminary Candi- 
date," and his examinations are spoken of as '' preliminary examinations." 

Good English. — Particular attention is called to the fact that the 
habitual use of good English is required in all subjects throughout the 
entrance examinations. However excellent in substance^ no examination 
will be considered entirely satisfactory unless it is free from elementally 
errors in spelling., usage, punctuation., grammar., sentence- structure, and 
paragraphing . It is improbable that candidates will be able to satisfy 
this requirement unless they have been trained in school to regard their 
worh in every subject as an opportunity for the use of correct and idio- 
matic English. In dealing with foreign languages., idioms strange to 
English should be especially avoided. When the answers are of consider- 
able length candidates are advised to plan them before they begin to 
write. In every case they are urged to save the last few minutes of the 
examination for the revision and co7'rection of details. 



29 

Laboratory Examinations. — A candidate who is examined in any study 
in which a laboratory examination is held will hand in his laboratory note- 
book at the hour of the laboratory examination. Laboratory note-books 
will be deposited, after examination, in the College office, where they will 
be kept for one year, subject to the order of the owners. 

September 17-20, 1917 

In September, 1917, examinations will be held in Cambridge only. 
The time-schedule will be as follows : — 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 

September 17 September 18 September 19 September 20 

9 A.M.-12 M. 9 A.M.-12 M. 9 A.M. -12 M. 9 A.M.-12 M. 

English Latin Elementary Mathematics History 

2 P.M. -5 P.M. 2 P.M. -5 P.M. 2 P.M. -5 P.M. 2 P.M.-5 P.M. 

Physics French German Greek 

Chemistry Spanish Advanced Mathematics 

Partial List of Examination Centres for June, 1917. — The following list 
which is given to forestall a considerable number of inquiries, contain some 
of the more important places at which the Board w411 hold examinations in 
June, 1917: — 

Alabama^ Birmingham. 

Arkansas, Little Rock. 

California, Berkeley, IjOS Angeles. 

Colorado, Denver. 

Connecticut, Bridgeport, Danbury, Derby, Hartford, Middletown, New 

Haven, Norwalk, Norwich, Stamford, Waterbury, Wins ted. 
Delaware, Wilmington. 
District of Columbia, Washington. 
Florida, Jacksonville. 
Georgia, Atlanta, Savannah. 
Idaho, Boise. 
Illinois, Chicago, Peoria. 
Indiana, Indianapolis. 
Iowa, Davenport, Des Moines, Dubuque. 
Kentucky, Louisville. 
Louisiana, New Orleans. 
Maine, Bangor, Portland. 
Maryland, Baltimore. 



30 

Massachusetts y Amherst, Beverly, Boston, Cambridge, Fall River, Fitchburg, 
Great Barrington, Lowell, New Bedford, Newburyport, Northampton, 
South Hadley, Springfield, Tufts College, Wellesley, Williamstown, 
Worcester. 

Michigan, Detroit. 

Minnesota, Minneapolis. 

Missouri^ Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis. 

Montana, Helena. 

Nebraska, Omaha. 

New Hampshire, Concord, Hanover, Manchester. 

New Jersey, Asbury Park, Newark, New Brunswick, Passaic, Plainfield, 
Princeton, Trenton. 

New York, Albany, Brooklyn, Buffalo, Ithaca, New York, Pouglikeepsie, 
Rochester, Syracuse, Utica. 

North Carolina, Asheville. 

Ohio, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo, Youngstown. 

Oregon, Portland. 

Pennsylvania, Erie, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Reading, Scranton, 

Rhode Island, Newport, Providence, Westerly. 

South Carolina, Charleston. 

Tennessee, Memphis, Nashville. 

Texas, Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Houston. 

Utah, Salt Lake City. 

Vermont, Bellows Falls, Burlington, Rutland. 

Virginia, Richmond, Roanoke. 

Washington, Seattle, Spokane. 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee. 

Hawaii, Honolulu. 

STUDIES IN WHICH EXAMINATIONS ARE HELD 

1. ENGLISH 

The study of English in school has two main objects : (1) command of 
correct and clear English, spoken and written ; (2) ability to read with 
accuracy, intelligence, and appreciation. • 

Grammar and Composition 

The first object requires instruction in grammar and composition. 
English grammar should ordinarily be reviewed in the secondary school ; 
and correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be rigorously 
exacted in connection with all written work during the four years. The 
principles of English composition governing punctuation, the use of 



31 

words, sentences, and paragraphs, should be thoroughly mastered; and 
practice in composition, oral as well as written, should extend throughout 
the secondary school period. Written exercises may well comprise letter- 
writing, narration, description, and easy exposition and argument. It is 
advisable that subjects for this work be taken from the student's personal 
experience, general knowledge, and studies other than English, as well as 
from his reading in literature. Finally, special instruction in language 
and composition should be accompanied by concerted effort of teachers in 
all branches to cultivate in the student the habit of using good English in 
his recitations and various exercises, whether oral or written. 

Literature 

The second object is sought by means of two lists of books, headed 
respectively Reading and Study ^ from which may be framed a progressive 
course in literature covering four years. In connection with both lists, 
the student should be trained in reading aloud and be encouraged to com- 
mit to memory some of the more notable passages both inverse and in 
prose. As an aid to literary appreciation, he is further advised to acquaint 
himself with the most important facts in the lives of the authors whose 
works he reads and with their place in literary history. 

(a) Reading 

The aim of this course is to foster in the student the habit of intelligent 
reading and to develop a taste for good literature, by giving him a first- 
hand knowledge of some of its best specimens. He should read the books 
carefully, but his attention should not be so fixed upon details that he 
fails to appreciate the main purpose and charm of what he reads. 

With a view to large freedom of choice, the books provided for reading 
are arranged in the following groups, from each of which at least two 
selections are to be made, except as otherwise provided under Group I : — 

Group I. Classics in Translation. — The Old Testament, comprising 
at least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and Esther; 
the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, lY, V, 
XV, XVI, XVII; the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, of Books XI, 
XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; the Aeneid. The Odyssey, Iliad, and 
Aeneid should be read in English translations of recognized literary 
excellence. 

For any selection from this group a selection from any other group may 
be substituted. 

Group II. Shakspere. — Midsummer Night's Dream ; Merchant of 
Venice ; As You Like It ; Twelfth Night ; The Tempest ; Romeo and 



32 

Juliet; King John; Richard II; Richard III; Henry V; Coriolanus ; 
Julius Caesar* ; Macbeth* ; Hamlet*. 

Group III. Prose Fiction. — Malory's Morte d' Arthur (about 100 pages) ; 
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Part I ; Swift's Gulliver's Travels (voyages 
to Lilliput and to Brobdingnag) ; DeFoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; 
Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Frances Burney's Evelina; Scott's 
Novels (any one) ; Jane Austen's Novels (any one) ; Maria Edgeworth's 
Castle Rackrent, or The Absentee ; Dickens's Novels (any one) ; 
Thackeray's Novels (any one) ; George Eliot's Novels (any one) ; Mrs. 
Gaskell's Cranford ; Kingsley's Westward Ho ! or Hereward, the Wake ; 
Reade's The Cloister and the Hearth ; Blackmore's Lorna Doone ; 
Hughes's Tom Brown's Schooldays ; Stevenson's Treasure Island, or 
Kidnapped, or Master of Ballantrae ; Cooper's Novels (any one); Poe's 
Selected Tales; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, or Twice- 
Told Tales, or Mosses from an Old Manse; a collection of Short Stories 
by various standard writers. 

Group IV. Essays, Biography, etc. — Addison and Steele's The Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers, or Selections from the Tatler and Spectator 
(about 200 pages) ; Boswell's Selections from the Life of Johnson 
(about 200 pages) ; Franklin's Autobiography ; Irving's Sketch Book 
(about 200 pages) , or Life of Goldsmith ; Southey's Life of Nelson ; Lamb's 
Essays of Elia (about 100 pages) ; Lockhart's Life of Scott (about 200 
pages) ; Thackeray's Lectures on Swift, Addison, and Steele in the 
English Humourists ; Macaulay's Lord Clive, Warren Hastings, Milton, 
Addison, Goldsmith, Frederic the Great, Madame d'Arblay (any one) ; 
Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay (about 200 pages) ; Ruskin's Sesame and 
Lilies, or Selections (about 150 pages) ; Dana's Two Years before the 
Mast; Selections from Lincoln, including at least the two Inaugurals, the 
Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, 
and the Letter to Horace Greeley, together with a brief memoir or estimate ; 
Parkman's The Oregon Trail ; Thoreau's Walden ; Lowell's Selected 
Essays (about 150 pages) ; Holmes's The Autocrat of the Breakfast 
Table; Stevenson's An Inland Voyage, and Travels with a Donkey; 
Huxley's Autobiography, and selections from Lay Sermons, including the 
addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A Liberal Education, and 
A Piece of Chalk; a collection of Essays by Bacon, Lamb, DeQuincey, 
Hazlitt, Emerson, and later writers ; a collection of Letters by various 
standard writers. 

Group V. Poetry. — Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Books 
II and III, with special attention to Dry den, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and 
Burns; Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, with special 

* If not chosen for study under (6). 



33 

attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley (if not chosen for study 
under h) ; Goldsmith's The Traveller, and The Deserted Village ; Pope's 
The Rape of the Lock; a collection of English and Scottish Ballads, as, 
for example, some Robin Hood ballads, The Battle of Otterburn, King 
Estmere, Young Beichan, Bewick and Grahame, Sir Patrick Spens, and a 
selection from later ballads ; Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner, Christabel, 
and Kubla Khan; Byron's Childe Harold, Canto III or IV, and The 
Prisoner of Chillon ; Scott's The Lady of the Lake, or Marmion; 
Macaulay's The Lays of Ancient Rome, The Battle of Naseby, The 
Armada, Ivry ; Tennyson's The Princess, or Gareth andLynette, Lancelot 
and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The 
Lost Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, 
Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of 
the French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a 
Villa — Down in the City, The Italian in England, The Patriot, The Pied 
Piper, "De Gustibus" — , Instans Tyrannus ; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, 
and The Forsaken Merman; Selections from American Poetry, with 
special attention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow, and Whittier. 

(6) Study 

This part of the requirement is intended as a natural and logical con- 
tinuation of the student's earlier reading, with greater stress laid upon 
form and style, the exact meaning of words and phrases, and the under- 
standing of allusions. The books provided for study are arranged in four 
groups, from each of which one selection is to be made. 

Group I. Drama. — Shakspere's Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet. 

Group 11. Poetry. — Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and either 
Comus or Lycidas ; Tennyson's The Coming of Arthur, The Holy Grail, 
and The Passing of Arthur; the selections from Wordsworth, Keats, and 
Shelley in Book IV of Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series). 

Group III. Oratory. — Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; 
Macaulay's Two Speeches on Copyright, and Lincoln's Speech at Cooper 
Union; Washington's Farewell Address, and Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration. 

Group IV. Essays. — Carlyle's Essay on Burns, with a selection from 

Burns's Poems ; Macaulay's Life of Johnson ; Emerson's Essay on 

Manners. 

Examination 

However accurate in subject-matter, no paper will be considered satis- 
factory if seriously defective in punctuation, spelling, or other essentials 
of good usage. 

The examination will be divided into two parts, one of which will be on 
grammar and composition, and the other on literature. 



34 

In grammar and composition, the candidate may be asked specific 
questions upon the practical essentials of these studies, such as the relation 
of the various parts of a sentence to one another, the construction of 
individual words in a sentence of reasonable difficulty, and those good 
usages of modern English, which one should know in distinction from 
current errors. The main test in composition will consist of one or more 
essays, developing a theme through several paragraphs ; the subjects will 
be drawn from the books read, from the candidate's other studies, and 
from his personal knowledge and experience quite apart from reading. 
For this purpose the examiner will provide several subjects, perhaps eight 
or ten, from which the candidate may make his own selections. He will 
not be expected to write more than four hundred words per hour. 

The examination in literature will include : — 

A. General questions designed to test such a knowledge and appreciation 
of literature as may be gained by fulfilling the requirements defined 
under (<x) Reading, above. The candidate will be required to submit a 
list of the books read in preparation for the examination, certified by the 
principal of the school in which he was prepared ; but this list will not be 
made the basis of detailed questions. 

B. A test on the books prescribed for study, which will consist of 
questions upon their content, form, and structure, and upon the meaning 
of such words, phrases, and allusions as may be necessary to an under- 
standing of the works, and an appreciation of their salient qualities of 
style. General questions may also be asked concerning the lives of the 
authors, their other works, and the periods of literary history to which 
they belong. 

LATIN 
I. Amount and Range of the Reading Required 

1. The Latin reading, without regard to the prescription of particular 
authors and works, shall be not less in amount than Caesar, Gallic War, 
I-IV ; Cicero, the orations against Catiline, for the Manilian Law, and 
for Archias; Vergil, Aeneid, I-YI. 

2 . The amount of reading specified above shall be selected by the schools 
from the following authors and works : Caesar (Gallic War and Civil War) 
and Nepos (Lives) ; Cicero (orations, letters, and De Senectute) and Sallust 
(Catiline and Jugurthine War) ; Yergil (Bucolics, Georgics, and Aeneid) 
and Ovid (Metamorphoses, Fasti, and Tristia) . 



35 



II. Scope of the Examinations 

1. Translation at Sight. Candidates will be examined in translation at 
sight of both prose and verse. The vocabulary, constructions, and range 
of ideas of the passages set will be suited to the preparation secured by 
the reading indicated above. 

2. Prescribed Reading. Candidates will be examined also upon the 
following prescribed reading : Cicero, orations for the Manilian Law and 
for Archias, and Yergil, Aeneid, I, II, and either IV or VI, at the option 
of the candidate, with questions on subject-matter, literary and historical 
allusions, and prosody. Every paper in which passages from the prescribed 
reading are set for translation will contain also one or more passages for 
translation at sight ; and candidates must deal satisfactorily with both 
these parts of the paper, or they will not be given credit for either part. 

3. GramTYiar and Composition. The examinations in grammar and 
composition will demand thorough knowledge of all regular inflections, all 
common irregular forms, and the ordinary syntax and vocabulary of the 
prose authors read in school, with ability to use this knowledge in writing 
simple Latin prose. 

ELEMENTARY LATIN 

The requirements in Elementary Latin may be met by the following 
examinations of the Board : — 

Gramimar . — The examination will presuppose the reading of the re- 
quired amount of prose (see 1, 1 and 2) , including the prose works prescribed 
(see II, 2). 

Elementary Prose Composition. — The examination will presuppose the 
reading of the required amount of prose (see I, 1 and 2) , including the 
prose works prescribed (see II, 2) . 

Cicero {orations for the Manilian Law and for Archias) and Sight 
Translation of Prose. — The examination will presuppose the reading of 
the required amount of prose (see I, 1 and 2) 
or 

Vergil (Aeneid, /, //, and either IV or VI, at the option of the candi- 
date) and Sight Translation of Poetry . — Theexamination will presuppose 
the reading of the required amount of poetry (see I, 1 and 2) 



36 



TRENCH , 

The requirements in French follow the recommendations of the 
Committee of Twelve of the Modern Language Association of 
America.* 

Elementary French 

The Aim of the Instruction 

At the end of the elementary course the pupil should be able to pro- 
nounce French accurately, to read at sight easy French prose, to put into 
French simple English sentences taken from the language of every-day 
life or based upon a portion of the French text read, and to answer 
questions on the rudiments of the grammar as defined below. 

The Work to he done 
During the first year the work should comprise : 

1. Careful drill in pronunciation. 

2. The rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular 

and the more common irregular verbs, the plural nouns, the in- 
flection of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of 
personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and conjunc- 
tions ; the order of words in the sentence, and the elementary 
rules of syntax. 

3. Abundant easy exercises, designed not only to fix in the memory the 

forms and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness 
in the reproduction of natural forms of expression. 

4. The reading of from 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of graduated texts, 

with constant practice in translating into French easy variations 
of the sentences read (the teacher giving the English) and in 
reproducing from memory sentences previously read. 

5. Writing French from dictation. 

Suitable texts for the first year : A well-graded reader for beginners ; 
^r\n\o^ Le tour de la France \ Compayre, Yvan Gall\ Laboulaye, Contes 
bleus] Malot, Sans famille. 

During the second year the work should comprise : 

1. The reading of from 250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the 
form of stories, plays, or historical or biographical sketches. 

* The Report of the Committee of Twelve, which was submitted in December, 
1898, may be obtained in separate book form from D. C. Heath & Co. The lists of texts 
at present given in tlie requirements of the College Entrance Examination Board were 
recommended by a committee of the Modern Language Association in December, 1910. 



37 



GERMAN 

The requirements in German follow the recommendations of the 
Committee of Twelve of the Modern Language Association of America.* 

Elementary German 

The Aim of the Instruction 

At the end of the elementary course in German the pupil should be able 
to read at sight, and to translate, if called upon, by way of proving ability 
to read, a passage of very easy dialogue or narrative prose, help being given 
upon unusual words and construction, to put into German short English 
sentences taken from the language of every-day life or based upon the text 
given for translation, and to answer questions upon the rudiments of the 
grammar, as defined below. 

The Woy^k to he done 

During the first year the work should comprise : 

1. Careful drill upon pronunciation. 

2. The memorizing and frequent repetition of easy colloquial sentences. 

3. Drill upon the rudiments of grammar ; that is, upon the inflection of 

the articles, of such nouns as belong to the language of every-day 
life, of adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs and the more usual 
strong verbs ; also upon the use of the more common prepositions, 
the simpler uses of the modal auxiliaries, and the elementary 
rules of syntax and word-order. 

4. Abundant easy exercises designed not only to fix In mind the forms 

and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness in the 
reproduction of natural forms of expression. 

5. The reading of from 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a reader, 

with constant practice in translating into German easy variations 
upon sentences selected from the reading lesson (the teacher 
giving the English), and in the reproduction from memory of 
sentences previously read. 

* The Report of the Committee of Twelve, which was submitted in December, 1898, 
may be obtained in separate book form from D. C. Heath & Co. The lists of texts at 
present given in the requirements of the College Entrance Examination Board were 
recommended by a committee of the Modern Language Association in December, 1910. 



38 



SPANISH 

The requirement in Spanish, which follows the form and spirit of 
the recommendations made for French and German by the Committee 
of Twelve of the Modern Language Association, is based upon recom- 
mendations made by a committee of that Association in December, 
1910. 

The Aim of the Instruction 

At the end of the elementary course the pupil should be able to pro- 
nounce Spanish accurately, to read at sight easy Spanish prose, to put into 
Spanish simple English sentences taken from the language of every-day 
life or based upon a portion of the Spanish text read, and to answer 
questions on the rudiments of the grammar, as indicated below. 

The Work to he Done 

During the first year the work should comprise : 

1. Careful drill in pronunciation. 

2. The rudiments of grammar, including the conjugation of the regular 

and the more common irregular verbs, the inflection of nouns, 
adjectives, and pronouns, and the elementary rules of syntax. 

3. Exercises containing illustrations of the principles of grammar. 

4. The careful reading and accurate rendering into good English of 

about 100 pages of easy prose and verse, with translation into 
Spanish of easy variations of the sentences read. 

5. Writing Spanish from dictation. 

During the second year the work should comprise : 

1. The reading of about 200 pages of prose and verse. 

2. Practice in translating Spanish into English, and English variations 

of the text into Spanish. 

3. Continued study of the elements of grammar and syntax. 

4. Mastery of all but the rare irregular verb forms and of the simpler 

uses of the modes and tenses. 

5. Writing Spanish from dictation. 

6. Memorizing of easy short poems. 

The emphasis should be placed on careful thorough work with much 
repetition rather than upon rapid reading. The reading should be selected 
from the following : A collection of easy short stories and lyrics, carefully 
graded; Juan Valera, El pdjaro verde-^ Perez Escrich, Fortuna\ Ramos 
Carrion and Vital Aza, Zaragueta ; Palacio Valdes, Jose ; Pedro de Alarcon, 
El Capitdn Veneno; the selected short stories of Pedro de Alarcon or 
Antonio de Trueba. 



39 

Every secondary school in which Spanish is taught should have in its 
library several Spanish-English and English-Spanish dictionaries, the all- 
Spanish dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy; one or more manuals 
of the history of Spanish literature, such as that by Eitzmaurice-Kelly, 
and Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature. 

HISTORY 
Elementary History 

The requirements in History are based on the recommendations of 
the Committee of Seven of the American Historical Association. 

A. Ancient History, with special reference to Greek and Roman 
History, and including also a short introductory study of the more ancient 
nations and the chief events of the early Middle Ages, down to the death 
of Charlemagne. 

B. Mediaeval and 3fodern European History, from the death of Charle- 
magne to thfe present time (1). 

C English History (1). 

D. American History and Civil Government (1). 

The examinations in history will be framed so as to require the use of 
both judgment and memory on the pupil's part. They will presuppose 
the use of good text-books, collateral reading, and practice in written 
work. Geographical knowledge will be tested by requiring the location of 
places and movements on an outline map. 

The Report of the Committee of Seven, which appeared in the Proceed- 
ings of the American Historical Association for 1898, was published sepa- 
rately under the title, '' Study of History in Schools," by The Macmillan 
Company in 1899. It was incorporated in the Report made to the National 
Education Association in 1899 by the Committee on College Entrance 
Requirements. 

The attention of teachers is called also to the report of the Committee 
of Five of the American Historical Society, ^'The Study of History in 
Secondary Schools" (New York, The Macmillan Company, 1911). The 
examiners of the Board will endeavor to frame the examination papers on 
the four fields of work defined ahove in accordance with the recommendations 
of this committee. 

MATHEMATICS 

A thorough practical acquaintance with ordinary Arithmetic is assumed 
as underlying all preparation in Mathematics. Knowledge of the funda- 
mental principles of Arithmetic and careful training in accurate computa- 
tion with whole numbers and with vulgar and decimal fractions form an 



40 

essential part of early school work. But the pupil's time should not be 
wasted in the solution by arithmetic of puzzling problems which properly 
belong to algebra, or in complicated and useless reductions, or in the 
details of commercial arithmetic. It is desirable that some familiarity 
with algebraic expressions and symbols, including the methods of solving 
simple equations, be acquired in connection with the course in Arithmetic. 

> 

Elementary Mathematics 

Elerifientary Algebra. — Algebra, through Quadratic Equations. 

The requirement in Algebra includes the following subjects : factors, 
common divisors and multiples, fractions, ratios and proportions ; negative 
quantities and the interpretation of negative results ; the doctrine of expo- 
nents ; radicals and equations involving radicals ; the binomial theorem 
for positive integral powers of the binomial, and the extraction of roots ; 
arithmetical and geometrical progressions ; putting questions into equations 
and the reduction of equations ; the ordinary methods of elimination and 
the solution of both numerical and literal equations of the first and second 
degrees with one or more unknown quantities and of problems leading to 
such equations. 

The student should cover carefully the whole ground here specified, 
and should acquire a thorough understanding not only of the practice, but 
of the reasons involved in the elementary algebraic rules ; for example, 
in the rules of multiplication, of signs, and of exponents, in the rules for 
fractions, and in those relating to the reduction and solution of equations. 
He should train himself to practical skill by the solution of a large number 
of examples, and should learn to do his work with reasonable quickness, 
as well as with confidence, accuracy, and clearness. The solution of 
fairly complicated literal quadratics, the various methods of elimination 
for equations of the first two degrees, the putting of problems in a neat 
manner into equations, and the working of the various algebraic operations 
both for integral and fractional expressions may be mentioned as important 
subjects of attention. The student should be taught to arrange his work 
in a clear, orderly, and compact fashion. 

The time supposed to be devoted to the systematic study of the require- 
ment in Algebra is the equivalent of a course of three lessons a week 
through two school years. 

PLANE GEOMETRY 

The usual theorems and constructions of good text-books,* including the 
general properties of plane rectilinear figures ; the circle and the measure- 

* The Board's examination questions in plane and solid geometry will be limited to 
propositions contained in the syllabus prepared by the National Committee of Fifteen 
appointed by the American Federation of Teachers of the Mathematical and Natural 
Sciences and the National Education Association. The Report of the Committee was pub- 
lished in The Mathematics Teacher for December, 1912. Reprints of the Report may 
be obtained gratis upon application to the Commissioner of Education, Department of 
the Interior, Washington, D. C. 



41 

ment of angles ; similar polygons ; areas ; regular polygons and the 
measurement of the circle. 

The solution of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. 

Applications to the mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

SOLID GEOMETRY 

The usual theorems and constructions of good text-books,* including 
the relations of planes and lines in space ; the properties and measurement 
of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, and cones; the sphere and the spherical 
triangle. 

The solution of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. 

Applications to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. 

PHYSICS 

A course of study dealing with the leading elementary facts and prin- 
ciples of Physics. 

The instruction given in this course should accord with the following 
specifications : — 

1. The unit in Physics [full requirement J consists of at least 120 hours of 60 minutes each. 

[If this study is taken earlier than the last year of the school course, more time should 
be allowed for it.] Time spent in the laboratory shall be counted at one-half face 
value. 

2. The course of instruction in Physics should include: — 

(a) The study of one standard text-book for the purpose of obtaining a connected 
and comprehensive view of the subject. The student should be given opportunity 
and encouragement to consult other scientific literature. 

(b) Instruction by lecture table demonstrations to be used mainly for illustration 
of the facts and phenomena of Physics in their qualitative aspects and in their practical 
applications. 

(c) Individual laboratory work, consisting of experiments requiring at least the 
time of 30 double periods [60 full hours in all]. The experiments performed by each 
student should number at least 30. Those named in the appended list ate suggested 
as suitable. [This reference is to the Board List, which is not here reproduced.] The 
work should be so distributed as to give a wide range of observation and practice. 

The aim of the laboratory work should be to supplement the pupil's fund of concrete 
knowledge and to cultivate his power of accurate observation and clearness of thought 
and expression. The exercises should be chosen with a view to furnishing forceful 
illustrations of fundamental principles and their practical applications. They should 
be such as yield results capable of ready interpretation, obviously in conformity with 
theory [not so inaccurate or uncertain as to obscure the principles they are intended 
to illustrate], and free from the disguise of unintelligible units. 

Slovenly work should not be tolerated, but the effort for precision should not lead to the 
use of apparatus or processes so complicated as to obscure the principle involved. 

3. Throughout the whole course special attention should be paid to the common illus- 

trations of physical laws and to their industrial applications. 

* See foot-note, p. 36. 



42 

4. In the solution of numerical problems the student should be encouraged to make use of 
the simple principles of algebra and geometry to reduce the difficulties of solution. 
Unnecessary mathematical difficulties should be avoided and care should be exercised 
to prevent the student's losing sight of the concrete facts, in the manipulation of 
symbols. 

The Examination. — The candidate is required to pass both a written examination and a 
laboratory examination. 

The laboratory examination, in the course of which oral questioning may be freely used, 
will require performance by the candidate of a number of experiments assigned to him at the 
time by the examiner, the range of assignment being limited by the following provision: The 
candidate must name as the basis for his laboratory examination at least thirty exercises 
selected from a list of about fifty, described in a publication issued by Harvard University 
under the title Descriptive List of Elementary Exercises in Physics.* 

This laboratory examination may occupy the candidate from one and a half to two and a 
half hours, no time limit, as a rule, being set for it. 

The candidate is required to present a note-book in which he has recorded the steps and the 
results of his laboratory exercises, and this note-book must bear the endorsement of his 
teacher, certifying that the notes are a true record of the pupil's work. It should contain a 
table of contents of the exercises which it describes. These exercises need not be the same as 
those upon which the candidate presents himself for the laboratory examination, but should 
be equivalent to them in amount and grade of quantitative work. 

The note-book is required as proof that the candidate has formed the habit of keeping a 
full and intelligible record of laboratory work through an extended course of experiments, 
and that his work has been of such a character as to raise a presumption in favor of his prepa- 
ration for the examination. But much greater weight will be given to the laboratory examina- 
tion than to the note-book in determining the candidate's attainments in physics. Experience 
has shown that pupils can make the original record of their observations entirely presentable, 
so that copying will be unnecessary, and they should in general be required to do so. 



CHEMISTRY 

A course of systematic instruction in the principles of Chemistry and 
their application. 

The candidate is required to pass both a written and a laboratory exami- 
nation. The preparation required for the written examination may be 
found in the Revised Requirements in Chemistry issued by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. The preparation required for the laboratory 
examination is the performance by the student of not less than forty 
experiments of good length and quality similar in character and scope to 
those given in the requirements mentioned above. The candidate is 
further required to present the original note-book in which he recorded the 
steps and results of the experiments which he performed at school, and 
this note-book must bear the endorsement of his teacher, certifying that 
the notes are a true record of the pupil's work. It should contain an index 
of the exercises which it describes. Experiments not offered for examina- 

* This list may be obtained, price 40 cents, at 2 University Hall, Cambridge. 
In place of the Harvard Descriptive List, the revised list of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board, as adopted in 1909, may be used. 



43 

tion must be plainly designated. This note-book is required as proof that 
the candidate has formed the habit of keeping a full and intelligible record 
of laboratory work made during the actual progress of his experiments. 
The original record of all data and observations should be presented. 
Greater weight will be given to the laboratory examination than to the 
note-book in determining the candidate's attainments in Chemistry. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geography . — A course of study equivalent to that described in the 
outline of requirements in Geography published by the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

BOTANY AND ZOOLOGY 

Botany. — A course of study and laboratory work equivalent to that 
indicated in an outline of requirements in Botany, issued by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. The course should extend through at 
least half of a school year, with five lessons a week. 

Zoology. — A course of study and laboratory work equivalent to that 
described in a pamphlet entitled an outline of requirements in Zoology, 
issued by the College Entrance Examination Board. The course should 
extend through at least half of a school year, with five lessons a week. 

In Botany and in Zoology the candidate will be required to pass both a written and a 
laboratory examination. The written examination will test the range and thoroughness of 
his knowledge of the subject. The laboratory examination will test his skill in observation 
and experimentation, and his ability to apply names properly to the parts of the organisms 
studied.* 

At the time of the laboratory examination the candidate must present the original note- 
book containing (with dates) the notes and drawings he has made in the course of his labora- 
tory work, and bearing the endorsement of his teacher, certifying that the book is a true 
record of the pupil's own observations and experiments. An index of subjects should be 
appended. 

DRAWING 

A course of drawing, in either or both of the following branches, equiva- 
lent to that described in the outline of requirements in Drawing, issued by 

the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Freehand Drawing. — The representation of simple objects, in outline 

and with shading. 

The candidate's preparation in drawing should be directed toward training him in accurate 
observation and in definite and truthful representation of form, without attempt to represent 
color or color values. 

The candidate should be able to draw correctly and with lines of good quality simple form 
in correct perspective in the size in which it is felt in the plane of the drawing, or larger or 

* For rules relating to laboratory examinations and note-books, see p. 29. 



44 

smaller. It is recommended that pupils should be taught to draw from the object itself rather 
than from the flat. 

Correctness of proportion and accuracy in the angles and curves and structural relations of 
the parts of every object drawn are of the highest importance. 

The elementary principles of perspective are to be thoroughly learned, and the candidate 
should be able to apply them in freehand drawing from the object or from the imagination. 

No definite prescription as to method of teaching is made. The examination will test the 
preparation of the candidate in the following points: — 

1. Ability to sketch from the object with reasonable correctness as to proportion, structure 

and form. It is recommended that the subjects drawn include simple geometrical 
objects and simple natural objects, such as living plant forms. 

2. Ability to sketch freehand from dictation with reasonable accuracy any simple geomet- 

rical figure or combination of figures. 

3. Ability to represent accurately in perspective a simple geometrical solid of which pro- 

jection drawings are given, and ability to make consistent projection drawings of a 
simple geometrical solid of which a perspective representation is given . 

4. Ability to answer questions in regard to the principles involved in making these drawings. 

Mechanical Drawing. — A course in drawing equivalent to that de- 
scribed in the definition of requirements in Mechanical Drawing published 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT 

Civil Government. — Civil Government in the United States (national, 
state, and local) ; its constitution, organization, and actual working. 

The candidate will be expected to show, on examination, such general 
knowledge of the field as may be acquired from the study of a good text- 
book of not less than three hundred pages, supplemented by collateral 
reading, and discussion. The examination will call for familiarity with 
constitutional questions and with the procedure of legislative bodies. 

For preparation in this subject, a course of study equivalent to at least three lessons a week 
for one year will be necessary. 

REGISTRATION 

The academic year 1917-18 begins on Monday, September 24, 1917. All 
students register at the Dental School, Longwood Avenue, on that day, 
at 9 A.M. 



45 

• FOUR-YEAR COURSE 

Beginning September 24, 1917 

First Year First Second 

Term Term 

Biology 240 

Chemistry, Qualitative, and Metallurgy 240 

(1 month General) Inorganic and Dental 

English — conference and theses 64 64 

Histology 220 

General Pathology 80 

Anatomy 180 

Prosthetic Dentistry — technique 80 80 

. Second Year 

Physiology 240 

Bacteriology 153 

Oral Anatomy; Histology, Normal and Pathological . . 105 

Prosthetic Dentistry — technique 144 168 

Chemistry, Organic, Physiological and Clinical .... 180 

Operative Technique 240 

Third Year 

Materia Medica — Lectures 16 16 

Dental Pathology — Lectures 16 

Crown and Bridge — Lectures 8 8 

Operative Dentistry — Lectures 16 16 

Operative Dentistry — Practice 240 240 

Prosthetic Dentistry — Lectures 16 16 

Prosthetic Dentistry — Practice 264 264 

Inlay Work 48 

Radiography — Lectures (Demonstrations in sections) . 16 16 

Syphilology — Lectures and conferences . . . .^-r— . . . 

Neurology — Lectures 4 

Fourth Year 

Applied Therapeutics — Lectures 10 

Operative Dentistry — Lectures 16 16 

Surgery, etc. — Lectures 16 16 

Operative Surgery — Sections 

Crown and Bridge — Lectures 8 8 

Crown and Bridge — Practice 48 48 

Orthodontia — Lectures 16 16 

Orthodontia — Practice 91 64 

Inlay Work 48 48 

Operative Dentistry — Practice 229 256 

Prosthetic Dentistry — Practice 237 216 

Physical Diagnosis — Sections 

Dental Jurisprudence and Conduct of Practice 10 



46 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

Dental and Physiological Chemistry 

H. Carlton Smith, Ph.G., Lecturer on Dental Chemistry . 
Fred M. Rice, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry. 

As dentistry is more and more coming to be considered a specialty of 
medicine it becomes necessary to broaden the chemical field covered by 
the dental curriculum to include not only the metallurgy and qualitative 
analysis, which a few years ago constituted nearly the whole of Dental 
Chemistry, but also practically all the branches required by the medical 
schools, with emphasis directed of course to dental rather than medical 
requirements. In recognition of this fact the chemistry course comprises 
a study of the following subjects, taken in about the order named : — 

Advanced General Chemistry, including the fundamental principles of 
physical chemistry, such as mass action, ionization, equilibrium 
solution, and precipitation. 

Qualitative Analysis of solutions and solids, including examination of 
alloys, dental cements, etc. 

The Principles of Volumetric Analysis in sufficient detail to enable a 
student to make quantitative examination of a dental alloy or deter- 
mine the strength of hydrogen peroxide solutions. 

Organic Chemistry to make possible an intelligent study of physi- 
ological chemistry. Then a short course in clinical chemistry 
designed to show the relations existing between oral and systemic 
conditions. 

A short chemical thesis is required of each student, w^hich necessitates 
the careful study of current dental literature and a consideration of the 
various theories regarding dental decay, erosion, etc. 

Daily lectures and laboratory work, with oral quizzes or recitation 
twice and written tests once each week, constitute the method of instruc- 
tion for the entire course aggregating about 140 half-days, equivalent to 
about twelve weeks of solid time. 

Text-hooks. — Chemistry for Dental Students, third edition. Smith. 
Fifth edition of Practical Physiological Chemistry, Hawk. Dental Metal- 
lurgy, Essig. Organic Chemistry, Norris. 

Reference Boohs. — Holland's Medical Chemistry and Toxicology. 
Ogden, Examination of Urine. Hammarsten, Physiological Chemistry. 
Stieglitz, Qualitative Analysis. Alexander Smith, General Chemistry for 
Colleges. 



47 

Lectures. Mr. Smith. Five times a week throughout the first half of 
the first year and three times a week for twelve weeks during the 
second year. 93 

Demonstrations or Laboratory Experiments. Mr. Smith and Mr. Rice. 
Three hours a day, five times a week throughout the first half of first 
year and three tim.es a week for twelve weeks during the second year. 

309 

English. Instruction in English is an integral part of the chemistry 
course. Compositions chosen from that portion already pursued by 
the class are required frequently, and are examined by the English 
instructor for criticism and suggestions on both form and substance. 
No student is given a passing grade unless he can express his ideas 
clearly and accurately. This course in English composition is 
required of all candidates for the degree. 

Anatomy 

John L. Bremer, M.D., Associate Professor of Histology. 

Frederic T. Lewis, M.D., Associate Professor of Embryology. 

John Warren, M.D., Associate Prof essor of Anatomy . 

Edward A. Boyden, Ph.D., Instructor in Co^mparative Anatomy. 

Robert M. Green, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Kurt H. Thoma, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Histology and Pathology. 

Archibald McK. Eraser, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy . 

George A. Leland, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Richard H. Miller, M.D., Assista7it in Anatomy. 

William R. Morrison, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Edward H. Risley, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Albert A. Shapira, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Donald M. Glover, Teaching Fellow in Histology. 

Ralph F. Shaner, Ph.B., Teaching Fellow in Histology. 

Frederick F. Furfey, D.M D., Fellow in Anatomy . 

Clarence G. Severy, D.M.D., Fellow in Anatomy. 



, Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 

, Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 

The department of anatomy occupies the Morgan Anatomical Building ; 
the dissecting rooms are in the wing designated B I ; and the laboratories 
for histology, embryology, and comparative anatomy, in the wing B II. 
In addition to the numerous class-rooms, which are well lighted and 
thoroughly equipped, there are ample accommodations for advanced stu- 



48 

dents, and unusual facilities are at the disposal of qualified investigators. 
Further information in regard to advanced or special studies may be had 
upon application to Professor Warren or Professor Lewis. The regular 
courses for dental students are described below. 

Confiparative Anatomy and Biology. Beginning with 1917, the course 
in comparative anatomy will be expanded to form a three-months' course 
in biology occupying the mornings of September, October, November, and 
December until the Christmas recess. This change, made possible by the 
addition of a fourth year to the curriculum of the Dental School, repre- 
sents the culmination of a long-continued effort on the part of the Division 
of Anatomy and of the Administrative Board of the Dental School to 
furnish more adequate preliminary training for later courses in human 
anatomy, physiology, pathology, and bacteriology. The new plans pro- 
vide for the laboratory study of both invertebrates and vertebrates, the 
former to occupy the first five weeks, the latter the remaining seven 
weeks of the course. Some attention will be given to plant biology, but 
the course will deal mainly with animals. In order to familiarize the 
student with as wide a range of animals as possible and to teach some- 
thing of their natural history, occasional field excursions will be intro- 
duced to supplement the usual museum visits. By means of the laboratory 
exercises a general knowledge of the morphology and life processes of the 
more representative groups of the animal kingdom will be obtained. At 
the same time, especial attention will be given to phases of the subject 
which have a direct bearing on subsequent courses, such as the compara- 
tive anatomy of the teeth in relation to dental courses, and a general 
survey of the field of parasitology in anticipation of the course in human 
pathology. An important corollary to the more theoretical discussions in 
the lectures will be the collateral reading, on the part of the students, of 
selected portions of the biological classics. Laboratory outlines will be 
provided for the course, and in addition students will be advised to pur- 
chase Hegner's College Zoology (MacMillan, 1915) for use as a general 
reference book. The laboratory fee for the course will be $10. 

September, October, November^ and December (to the Recess) hours 

Lectures. Dr. Boyden. Five tim.es a week and alternate Saturdays 
beginning September 29. 66 

Laboratory work. Dr. Boyden, Messrs. Shaner, , and . 

Three hours a day, five times a week and alternate Saturdays, 
as above. 200 

Gross Human Anatomy. Beginning on Friday, February 1, and con- 
tinuing to the April recess, the class will have systematic daily lectures or 



49 

demonstrations on gross anatomy at two o'clock, followed by dissection 
in the laboratory until 5.30. The dissection is supervised by the assistants 
in the course who will hold frequent oral quizzes. On Saturday mornings 
there will be additional special lectures and demonstrations, and on several 
occasions written tests. The study of the bones and joints Avill be con- 
ducted simultaneously with the dissection by means of specimens which 
will be issued in boxes to each student. In this manner the study of the 
anatomy of the entire body will be completed at the beginning of the April 
recess. Special emphasis is laid on the study and dissection of the head 
and neck, proportionally more time being devoted to this portion of the 
course than in the case of medical students. Special attention is given to 
the cavities of the head and face, and each student is expected to study and 
draw carefully specimens and frozen sections of the head in addition to 
his own dissection. 

The afternoons of the four weeks following the April recess will be 
devoted to the course in oral anatomy and histology, described below. 
The remaining afternoons of May will be devoted to a complete review of 
the entire course. 

Text-hooks. — Piersol's " Human Anatomy " is recommended, for which 
either Cunningham's or Gray's Anatomy may be substituted ; and for 
collateral reading, — Dixon's " Manual of Human Osteology," Ivy's " Ap- 
plied Anatomy for Dental Students," and Treves's "Applied Anatomy." 

Fees. — Each regular dental student is charged a laboratory fee of nine 
dollars, of which six dollars is for dissecting room material, and three 
dollars for chemicals and microscopical sections used in other first-year 
courses. This laboratory fee is to be paid to the Bursar. At the begin- 
ning of the course each student is provided with a locker in the dissecting 
room and another in the histological laboratory. One dollar is deposited 
for each locker, to be repaid on returning the locker keys. At the end of 
the course any student who has broken or lost material belonging to the 
laboratory will be charged the cost of replacing the same . 

February .) March, and April hours 

Lectures or demonstrations. Dr. Robert M. Green. Five times a week. 

54 

Dissection. Drs. Green, Risley, Eraser, Miller, Morrison, Shapira, 
and Leland. Two and one-half hours a day, jive times a week (^after- 
noons) . ^ 135 

Lectures and written tests. Three hours., Saturdays. 18 

Microscopic Anatomy. This course begins Friday, February 1, and 
occupies the week day mornings, except Saturday, until the April recess. 



50 

The first four weeks are devoted to the study of the differentiation and 
structure of the fundamental tissues; two weeks to embryological devel- 
opment, chiefly of the head ; and the remainder of the course to the micro- 
scopic anatomy of carefully selected organs of the human body. In the 
last week the structures related to the mouth cavity are especially empha- 
sized. Frequent examinations are introduced to test the progress of the 
students. The Text-book of Histology, arranged upon an embryological 
basis, by Lewis and Stohr, 2d edition, will be used, and the following 
books for collateral reading are recommended : Wilson, The Cell in De- 
velopment and Inheritance ; Foster, Lectures on the History of Physi- 
ology ; and Locy, Biology and its Makers ; Bryce's Embryology, and 
Schafer's Microscopic Anatomy, which are two volumes of the 11th 
edition of Quain's Anatomy. 

February^ March, and April (to the recess) hours 

Lectures. Associate Professors Bremer and Levtis. Five times a week. 

54 

Laboratory. Associate Professors Bremer and Lewis, Messrs. Shaner, 

Glover, and . Three hours a day, jive times a week. 162 

Physiology 

Walter B. Cannon, M.D., George Iligginson Processor of Physiology. 

Percy G. Stiles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Cecil K. Drinker, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

Alexander Forbes, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

McKeen Cattell, S.B., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 

Henry A. R. Kreutzmann, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 

Brenton R. Lutz, S.B., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 

Harold F. Pierce, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 



Alfred C. Redfield, S.B., Austin Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 

The instruction in Physiology is based, as far as possible, on observations 
made by the students in laboratory experiments. The experiments are 
selected to impress the student with the methods and the most important 
facts in the various divisions of the subject. Physiological processes not 
readily observed in the laboratory the student learns with an insight 
derived from practical experience in experimentation. The arrangement 
of the experiments is in general such that the student first learns of what 
activity an organ or tissue is capable, next how certain factors condition 
or modify that activity, and finally what may be the effect of the activity. 
The experiments have also been so arranged as to place those with more 



51 

general bearing first, and those with special interest later. Thus reference 
to previously acquired information becomes more and more possible as 
the course proceeds. 

The amount of time devoted to laboratory exercises is approximately 
one hundred and sixty hours. Each student is required to preserve a 
record of his experiments and observations in a laboratory note-book. 
These records are examined and criticized from day to day. 

Observations of his own experiments by the student are supplemented by 
more than thirty special demonstrations. These exercises, some of which 
are performed by students under the direction of an assistant, are closely 
correlated with the other objective instruction. The function of the 
depressor nerve, motor localization in the cerebral cortex, the action of 
secretin and of enterokinase, and the effects of lymphagogues are examples 
of subjects which are demonstrated. 

The facts observed in the laboratory and in the demonstrations are 
discussed in lectures. The lectures, about ninety in number, are informal 
discussions permitting questions by the students or by the instructor. In 
these discussions the laboratory experiments are correlated with one 
another and with the body of physiological knowledge. 

In order that students shall review the work repeatedly as the course 
proceeds, and also that the instructors may judge the efficiency of the 
teaching, the class is divided into sections and quizzed orally every week 
by the instructing staff. At the end of each general division of the sub- 
ject, as, for example, the nervous system, or the circulation, a written 
test is given. Usually five questions are asked ; as examples the following 
are illustrative : What are the effects of stimulating the vasoconstrictor 
nerves of any particular organ? Cite morphological and physiological 
evidence for segmental arrangement of the nervous system. Discuss 
cortical localization. The examination books are retiirned, corrected, to 
the students. 

If in the quizzes and tests many students show that certain points are 
not clearly understood, these points are briefly discussed again before the 
class. If a student reveals by his answers general failure to grasp the 
subject intelligently, he is personally conferred with regarding the charac- 
ter of his work. Such conferences are held after the first six weeks of 
the course, and usually result in a better understanding between the 
instructor and the student, and frequently in a marked improvement in 
the student's efforts. 

Text-hooks. — No special text-book is required, but the following books 
are recommended for reading in connection with the course : Text-book 
of Physiology, edited by E. A. Schafer. Howell, Text-book of Physi- 
ology. Stewart, Manual of Physiology. Tigerstedt, Text-book of Physi- 



52 

ology. Hermann, Lehrbuch der Physiologie. Nagel, Handbuch der 
Physiologie. 

November^ December, and January hours 

Laboratory experiments. Professor Cannon, Professor Porter, and 

Asst. Professor . Daily. 160 

Quizzes (14). One hour Saturdays. 14 

Written tests (5). One hour Mondays. 5 

Lectures (90). Professors Cannon and . 90 

Special demonstrations (30). Professors Cannon and . 15 

INVESTIGA TION 

Any student, properly qualified, who desires to engage in physiological 
research will be welcomed into the laboratory and will be offered every 
facility for research which the laboratory affords. 

Comparative Physiology 
William T. Porter, M.D., LL.D., Prof essor of Comparative Physiology, 

GRADUATE COURSES 

I. Physiological Research. Students qualified for research will pursue 
their investigations under the immediate direction of the Professor in 
charge. 

II. Comparative Physiology of Muscle. Professor Porter. Three 
hours weekly during February and March. 

III. Physiological Conference. Professor Porter. Demonstrations 
with informal discussions of selected problems in physiology. Mondays 
and Thursdays, 5 to 6 p.m., throughout the year. 

Bacteriology 

Harold C. Ernst, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology 

and Bacteriology, 
Cleaveland Floyd, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
Calvin G. Page, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology . 
Albert E. Steele, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
Horace K. Boutwell, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology . 
John W. Hammond, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology, 
Henry J. Perry, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology . 
Lesley H. Spooner, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology . 



Austin Teaching Fellow in Bacteriology . 



53 

Required bacteriology is taught by lectures and practical laboratory 
work. The lectures treat of the general subject and of methods of 
practical work. In the laboratory each student has an opportunity to 
become familiar with the simpler methods of manipulation and staining 
which are of especial clinical value, and with the more prominent of the 
pathogenic bacteria. 

Lectures. Professor Ernst. Daily, except Saturdays, during Octo- 
ber and Novemher. 40 

Laboratory work. Professor Ernst, and Drs. Steele, Page, Perry, 
BouTWELL, Spooner, and Floyd. Two to three hours daily dur- 
ing Octoher and Novemher. 120 

Oral Anatomy, Oral Histology and Pathology 

Oral Anatomy. This course consists of daily lectures and laboratory 
work. The students study the topography of the structures of the oral 
cavity by drawing horizontal and frontal sections from frozen specimens 
of the head ; later, the gross anatomy of the teeth is carefully studied, 
special attention being given to the pulp chamber and root canals and the 
occlusion of the teeth. 

Each student has to draw the various aspects of the different teeth, and 
sections through the root-canals as well as carve teeth from typical speci- 
mens. Extracted teeth are provided, the root canals of which are to be 
cleaned out, to familiarize the student with the important and difficult 
work of root-canal treatment. At the end of the course comparative 
anatomy of the teeth, the theories of evolution to the present type of 
teeth and phylogeny of the teeth also receive careful attention. 

Oral Histology and Pathology. The course consists of lectures and 
laboratory exercises and is devoted to the study of the histology and 
pathology of the soft and hard tissues and organs of the mouth, as well as 
the embryology of the face and mouth, including a careful study of the 
development of the temporary and permanent teeth and the salivary 
glands. 

The histological, embryological, and pathological work is taught by 
microscopic study, drawings from slides, demonstrations of models, speci- 
mens, and lantern slides. 

The knowledge gained by studying the histology of the healthy and 
diseased tissues side by side is not only invaluable in diagnosis, but is 
extremely important in developing and understanding medical and surgical 
therapeutic measures. 

Text-books. — Cryer, M. H., The Internal Anatomy of the Face (2d 
edition) . j 



54: 

Collateral Reading. — Broonell-Fischelis, Anatomy and Histology of 
the Mouth and Teeth, ed. 4. Plopewell-Smith, Dental Anatomy and 
Physiology. 

Lecture sand demonstrations. Dr. Thoma. Twice a week for four 
Tnonths. 

Laboratory exercises Drs. Thoma and . Three hours daily., twice 

a week. 

Written tests. 

Operative Dentistry 

Eugene H. Smith, D.M.D., Professor of Clinical Dentistry. 
William H. Potter, D.M.D., Professor of Operative Dentistry. 
Albert B. Jewell, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Forrest G. Eddy, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Dentistry. 
Frank Perrin, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Edwin C. Blaisdell, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Den- 
tistry. 
James Shepherd, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Thomas W. Wood, Jr., D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Benjamin H. Codman, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Frank T. Taylor, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Joseph T. Paul, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Harry S. Parsons, M.D., D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
James A. Furfey, D.M.D., Clinical Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
AsHER H. St.C. Chase, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Charles E. Parkhurst, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Clarence B. Vaughan, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Charles B. Burnham, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
William D. Squarebrigs, D.M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
John T. Timlin, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Ernest E. Carle, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Arthur A. Libby, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Edward P. White, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
David F. Spinney, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Charles A. Jameson, D.M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
Albert I. Mackintosh, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Leslie H. Naylor, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Samuel T. Elliott, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Walter A. Davis, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
James A. Heap, D.D.S., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Charles G. Pike, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Frank R. McCullagh, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 



55 

Martin B. Dill, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry, 
Harry A. Stone, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry, 
Raymond B. Carter, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Nathan A. Estes, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry, 
Leon J. Lawton, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Eugene B. Wyman, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
J. William O'Connell, D.M.D., Lecturer on Materia Medica, and In- 
structor in Operative Dentistry . 
Walter F. Provan, D.M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
W. Vernon Ryder, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Charles E. Stevens, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Arthur S. Crowley, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
JuDSON C. Slack, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry . 
Ernest V. L. Whitchurch, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Carl E. Safford, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Charles S. Emerson, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
William G. Jewett, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Lawrence E. McGourty, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 
Sterling N. Loveland, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry , 
Stephen P. Mallett, D.M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia, 
Stuart R. Hayman, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
Ernest L. Lockwood, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
Frederick C. Thomson, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry . 
W. Irving Ashland, D.M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 
Ralph D. Edson, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry, 
Stuart H. Yaughan, D.M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 
G. Brickett Blaisdell, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
Ralph C. Curtis, D.M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia 
C. Victor Johnston, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 
Clarence J. Smith, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry . 
Ellmore L. Wallace, D.M.D., Assistant in Operative Dentistry. 

The instruction in this department is systematically distributed over the 
course. The lectures deal first with the elemental principles of operative 
dentistry and then with the application of these principles to the simpler 
forms of operative work. The student is first required to arrange ex- 
tracted teeth in a metal model which imitates the shape of the jaws. 
Upon teeth thus mounted a variety of operations is performed. Thus 
familiarity with instruments, and ability in their use is developed. When 
a student has acquired operative ability by work upon the model, he is 
given patients. Upon these patients he performs at first the simpler oper- 
ations, then the more difficult ones and, in his senior year, all of the 
accredited operations belonging to the practice of Dentistry. 



56 

Clinical Lectures on Operative Dentistry. — These exercises are in- 
tended to demonstrate the individual methods of the lecturers. They 
include brief lectures, the exhibition of models, and practical operations 
upon patients. During the last half of the senior year lectures are given 
on the conduct of Practice and Jurisprudence. 

Text-hooks. — Black, Operative Dentistry. American Text-Book of 
Operative Dentistry. American System of Dentistry. Marshall, Oral 
Surgery. Marshall, Operative Dentistry. Johnson, Text-Book of Opera- 
tive Dentistry. Hewitt, Anaesthetics and Their Administration. Thoma, 
Oral Anaesthesia. 

Lectures. Professor Potter. Once a week throughout the year. 30 

Dr. Dill. Once a week throughout the year. 30 

Practical work. Drs. Jewell, Eddy, Perrin, Blaisdell, Shepherd, 
Wood, Codman, Taylor, Paul, Parsons, Furfey, Chase, Park- 
hurst, BuRNHAM, Squarebrigs, Timlin, Carle, Libby, Jameson, 
Spinney, White, Mackintosh, Naylor, Elliott, Davis, Heap, 
Pike, McCullagh, Stone, Carter, Estes, Lawton, Wyman, 
O'CoNNELL, Provan, Kyder, Stevens, Crowley, Slack, Whit- 
church, Safford, Emerson, Jewett, McGourty, Loveland, 
Mallett, Hayman, Lockwood, Thomson, Ashland, Edson, S. H. 
Yaughan, G. B. Blaisdell, Curtis, C. J. Smith, Wallace. 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Out-Patient Department. — Operative 
Clinic. Drs. Skinner, Anthony, Ringer, Durant, Furfey, Gul- 
lifer, MacInnis. Three hours each day throughout the year. 

Prophylaxis and Pyorrhoea Alveolaris 

Ned a. Stanley, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentist7y . 
Clarence J. Vaughan, D.M.D., Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

Pyorrhoea Alveolaris receives special attention. The etiology of the 
disease and its systemic treatment are considered in the lectures, and an 
operative course in instrumentation is given to the class in sections. 

Clinics. Three hours each week throughout the year. 96 

X-Kay Department. — D wight M. Clapp Foundation 
Earle C. Cummings, D.M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

A course of twelve or more lectures on Roentgenology supplemented by 
clinical demonstrations. 

It is aimed to touch briefly upon the subject in general, while giving 
special attention to the use of the X-ray in Dentistry. The interpretation 
of Dental radiographs is taken up in detail, and the value of the X-ray as 
a diagnostic agent is dwelt upon and illustrated with practical cases. 



57 

Collateral Reading. — Journal of American Roentgen- Society. Kassa- 
brau's Electro-Therapeutic and Roentgen Rays. Raper's Dental Radi- 
ography. 

Lectures. Dr. Cummings. Once a week for sixteen weeks. 

Extraction and Anaesthesia 

William H. Potter, D.M.D., Professor of Operative Dentistry . 

Edwin L. Farrington, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaes- 
thesia. 

Oliver P. Wolfe, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaesthesia. 

Albert L. Midgley, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaesthesia. 

Harold B. Norwood, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and A^iaes- 
thesia. 

Albert Herder, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaesthesia. 

Joseph A. Ring, D.M.D., Instructor in Extracting and Anaesthesia. 

J. Mark Smith, D.M.D., Assistant in Extracting and Anaesthesia. 

The subject of extraction is treated in the lectures upon operative den- 
tistry by Professor Potter. This treatment deals first with the anatomy 
of the roots and the root sockets and then the lines of least resistance along 
which teeth should be removed from their sockets. The technique of 
tooth extraction is explained and illustrated upon models. 

Anaesthesia as induced by nitrous oxide, nitrous oxide and oxygen, ether 
and somnoforme is described in lectures which deal with symptoms pro- 
duced and technique of administration. 

Local anaesthesia by the injection of novocaine according to the most 
approved methods is taught. 

Practical instruction in extracting and anaesthesia is available to stu- 
dents every day in the year with the exception of Sundays and holidays. 
Special attention is given to continuous anaesthesia by the use of nitrous 
oxide and oxygen, and students have ample opportunity to become familiar 
with operations under this system. 

Extracting Clinics. Professor Potter, Drs. Wolfe, Farrington, 
Midgley, Norwood, Herder, Ring, and J. Mark Smith. Two 
hours a day., throughout the year. 480 

Clinical Demonstrations of Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen Anaesthesia. Pro- 
fessor Potter. Once a week throughout the year. 64 

Course in Physical Diagnosis. The course includes examinations by the 
methods of inspection, percussion, and auscultation of the patients, 
supplemented by an examination of the blood pressure. It enables 
the student to distinguish such cases of the heart as would be unsafe 
to subject to the shock of surgical procedures or anaesthetics. 



58 



Pkosthetic Dentistry 

William P.Cooke, D.M.D., Professor of Prosiheiic Dentistry . 
Arthur W. Eldred, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Clarence M. Glazier, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Dennis .T. Hurley, T>M..T>.^ Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Wilson C. Dort, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Herbert F. Langley, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
William B. Rogers, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
William H. Weston, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Harry S. Clark, D.M.D., Inst7^uct or in Prosthetic Dentistry , 
Ubert C. Russell, D. 'Ml. T)., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentisti^y. 
Varaztad H. Kazanjian, D.M.D., Demonstrator of Prosthetic Den- 
tistry. 
Fred A. Beckford, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Edward H. Loomer, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Reinhold Ruelberg, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Ernest S. Calder, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Simon Myerson, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Clarence Shannon, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Nels H. Malmstrom, Y).M.T)., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Frederick J. Sullivan, D.M.D., Inst^^uctor in Prosthetic Dentisti^y. 
Adolph Gahm, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Thomas J. Giblin, Jr., D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
NiSHAN Der S. Tashjian, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Denti.stry . 
Allan W. Lord, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
George F. Marsh, Jr., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Harry Y. Nutter, D.M.D., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Raymond L. Webster, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Norman Ellard, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Charles W. Goetz, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Walter E. Wade, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Arthur L. Cavanagh, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry . 
Walter H. Chambers, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Frank H. Cushman, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Frank H. Leslie, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Simon De S. McCarty, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Habib Y. RIhan, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Francis J. Terra, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Benjamin S. Stevens, D.M.D., Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry. 



59 

» 

Lectures and demonstrations to the classes in sections, followed by 
practical work in the laboratory : the manner in which mineral teeth are 
constructed, the principles and method of carving and furnace-work, and 
all compounds used for artificial teeth ; and the manner in which gold and 
silver plates are prepared and adapted to the mouth ; the use of rubber 
and other articles as bases. It is the aim to teach not only the mere 
mechanical processes of Dentistry, but that combination of art with mech- 
anism which enables the practitioner to effect so much in restoring the 
symmetry of the face and usefulness of the teeth, where they have been 
lost or impaired by accident or disease. 

Lectures. Dr. Russell. Once a week. 32 

Lectures. Dr. Beckford. Once a week. 32 

Practical work. Drs. Eldred, Glazier, Hurley, Dort, Langley, 
Rogers, Weston, Clark, Russell, Beckford, Calder, Myerson, 
Shannon, Malmstrom, Sullivan, Gahm, Tashjian, Giblin, Jr., 
Lord, Marsh, Nutter, Webster, Ellard, Goetz, Wade, Cavan- 
AGH, Chambers, Cushman, Leslie, Rihan, Terra, and Stevens. 

Crown and Bridge Work 

William P. Cooke, D.M.D., Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Julius F. Hovestad, D.M.D., Lecturer on Crown and Bridge Work. 
Walter I. Brigham, D.D.S., Instructor in Crown and. Bridge Work. 
Thomas B. Hayden, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work. 
Horatio Le S. Andrews, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge 

Work. 
Maurice E. Peters, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work. 
Guy E. Flagg, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work. 
Frederick W. Hovestad, D.M.D., Instructor in Crown and Bridge 

Work. 
Walter N. Roberts, D.M.D., Assistant in Crown and Bridge Work. 

Lectures and Demonstrations. Professor Cooke and Dr. Hovestad. 
Once a week throughout the year. 30 

Practical Work. Drs. J. F. Hovestad, Hayden, Brigham, Flagg, 
Andrews, Peters, F. W. Hovestad, and Roberts. Three hours 
each week. 90 

Text-hook^. — Wilson, Dental Prosthesis. Richardson, Mechanical 
Dentistry. Turner's Prosthetic Dentistry. Kingsley, Oral Deformities. 
Hovestadt, Principles of Technique in Crowns and Bridges. Harris, 
Principles and Practice. Harris, Dictionary of Dentistry. Evans, Crown 
and Bridge Work. Goslee, Principles and Practice of Crowning Teeth. 



60 

Orthodontia 

Lawrence W. Baker, D.M.D., Assistant Professor of Orthodontia. 
Adelbert Fernald, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 
Horace L. Howe, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 
Walter C. Miner, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 
Hugh K. Hatfield, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 
Ralph E. Gove, D.M.D., Instructor in Orthodontia. 
Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia, 
Cleophas p. Bonin, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia. 
Harold L. Peacock, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia. 
Clarence G. Severy, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontia. 

Orthodontia is taught by lectures and by practical work in the Infirmary. 
During the second half of the second year there are lectures and demon- 
strations and the students are made familiar with the principles of normal 
occlusion and the various apparatus for the correction of irregularities. 
In the third year the diagnosis and treatment of the various forms of 
malocclusions and the etiology are taught by lectures and recitations. 
Each senior student is obliged to take not less than two cases of irregu- 
larities and carry them to completion under the direction of the professor 
in charge and his associates. On Tuesday and Friday afternoons con- 
ferences are held on the cases under treatment. 

Text-hooks.' — Angle, Treatment of Malocclusion of the Teeth and 
Fractures of the Maxillae. Farrar, Irregularities of the Teeth. Talbot, 
Irregularities. Guilford, Orthodontia. Case, Dental Orthopedia. 

Lectures. Professor Smith. Once a weeJc for fifteen weeks. 

Lectures. Asst. Professor Baker. Once a week throughout the year. 

Clinics. Drs. Baker, Howe, Fernald, Miner, Hatfield, Gove, Blu- 
menthal, Bonin, Peacock, and Severy. Seven hours a week through- 
out October and November. Four hours a week throughout balance 
of year. 147 

Inlay Work 

Amos I. Hadley, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 
Arthur J. Oldham, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 
Norman B. Nesbett, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 
Charles T. Warner, D.M.D., Instructor in Inlay Work. 

Demonstrations in gold and porcelain inlay work in the prosthetic lab- 
oratory and infirmary. 

Text-books. — Byram, Principles and Practice of Filling Teeth with 
Porcelain. Bruck, The Filling of Teeth with Porcelain. Peck, Porcelain 
Inlays. 



61 

Clinics. Drs. Hadley, Oldham, and Nesbett. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. 174 

Clinics. Drs. Hadley and Warner. Three hours a week for eighteen 
weeks during the year. 174 

Syphilology 
C. Morton Smith, M.D., Instructor in Syphilology . 

The course consists of lectures and clinical instruction given in the 
Dermatological Clinic of the Boston Dispensary where there is a very 
large proportion of syphilitics. Each student is given ample opportunity 
to see all of the common and many of the rarer manifestations of syphilis 
in the mouth and throat, as well as non- syphilitic conditions that may be 
misleading. 

Other manifestations of the disease are shown when of practical value 
or interest to the students. 

Lectures and Clinical Instruction. Throughout the first half of the year. 

Surgery, Surgical Pathology, and Oral Surgery 

George H. Monks, M.D., M.R.C.S., Professor of Oral Surgery. 
Leroy M. S. Miner, D.M.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery. 
John Bapst Blake, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Roger B. Taft, D.M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

Lectures embracing the general subjects of inflammation, suppuration, 
ulceration, gangrene, necrosis, erysipelas, septicemia, pyemia, shock, 
repair, etc. ; and special subjects which more particularly concern Oral 
Surgery. These lectures will be illustrated, so far as possible, by dia- 
grams, by demonstrations of pathological specimens, and by exhibition of 
clinical cases at the Boston City Hospital and by weekly clinics in the 
Surgical Department at the Dental School. Instruction will be given in 
the use of anaesthetics. 

Text-hooks. — Da Costa's Modern Surgery. Brewer's Surgery. Warren, 
Surgical Pathology. 

Lectures. Professor Monks. Once a week for twenty- four weeks. 24 

Clinics. Professor Monks, Asst. Professor Miner, and Dr. Taft. Once 
a week, throughout the year. 96 

Clinics. Asst. Professor Miner and Dr. Taft. Once a week, throughout 
the year. '64 



62 

Clinics. Dr. Blake. Once a week, for two months, at the Boston City 
Hospital. 8 or 9 

Operative Surgery 

Operations are performed before students one day each week through- 
out the year in the Amphitheatres at the Massachusetts General Hospital 
and the Boston City Hospital. 

Oral Hygiene 
George H. Wright, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Hygiene. 

Clinical Instruction during the third year. Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital. 

Dental Pathology 

Charles A. Brackett, D.M.D. , Professor of Dental Pathology . 
Kurt H. Thoma, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Histology and Pathology . 

In the beginning of the course of lectures the general principles of 
Pathology, including Etiology, Nosology, Semeiology, Diagnosis, and 
Prognosis, are outlined. The various pathological conditions in their 
relations to one another and their modifications of structure and function 
are taught. This prepares the way for the special pathology of the region 
with which the dentist has most to do. The diseases of the dental and 
contiguous tissues are considered in detail, with reference to their nature, 
causes, manifestations and terminations, and their relations with systemic 
conditions. The lectures will be supplemented with clinical demonstra- 
tions of pathological conditions. 

Text-hooks. — Burchard, Inglis, Dental Pathology and Therapeutics. 
Miller, Micro-organisms of the Human Mouth. 

Collateral Reading. — Barrett, Oral Pathology and Practice. McFar- 
land, Text-book of Pathology. Warren, Surgical Pathology and Thera- 
peutics. 

Lectures. Professor Brackett and Dr. Thoma. Once a week, through- 
out the year. ^^ 30 

Materia Medica and Pharmacology 

J. William O'Connell, D.M.D., Lecturer on Materia Medica, and In- 
structor in Operative Dentistry . 

The course includes the study of drugs used in medicine ; their sources, 
physical and chemical properties, constituents, preparations and doses. 



63 

Pharmacology, the science dealing with the action of drugs upon the 
tissues, o'rgans, and functions of the body, is given special attention. At 
frequent intervals demonstrations on animals will be given, showing the 
pharmacologic action of the more important drugs. 

Sufficient Therapeutics is taught to give students an intelligent idea of 
the use of drugs, and their application in pathological conditions. 

Toxicology, the study of poisons, their antidotes and antagonists, also 
the treatment in cases of poisoning, receive careful attention. 

Prescription writing and the incompatibility of drugs are duly con- 
sidered. 

Quizzes are held frequently throughout the year. 

Text-hooks. — Potter, Materia Medica, Pharmacy, and Therapeutics. 
Wood, Therapeutics, Materia Medica, and Toxicology. Butler, Materia 
Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics. Prinz, Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics. Buckley, Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Collateral Reading. — Hare, Practical Therapeutics. Thompson, 
Dietetics. 

Lectures and Conferences. Dr. O'Connell. Once a week throughout 
the second year. 32 

Neurology 
Edw^ard W. Taylor, M.D., Instructor in Neurology . 

A course of four lectures on Neurology will include a brief review of 
the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, the anatomy of the 
trifacial nerve being made the subject of special study. 

The nervous disturbances liable to be set up by dental irritation, and, 
conversely, those likely to produce odontalgia, will be considered as fully 
as the limited nature of the course permits, special attention being paid 
to trifacial neuralgia. The relation of certain functional disorders to the 
work of the dentist will also be considered. 

Lectures. Dr. Taylor. Once a week for four weeks. 4 



CLINICAL ADVANTAGES 

The Dental School is established in Boston in order to secure those 
advantages for Clinical Instruction which are found only in large cities. 

The clinics of the Dental Hospital afford a sufficient number of patients 
to give each student abundant practice in all branches of Dentistry. 



64 

Each student is assigned a chair in the Operative Infirmary and is 
required to operate three hours a day, five days each week, giving him 
during each year 480 hours of practice. 

Each student is assigned a bench in the Prosthetic Laboratory and is 
required to work at the bench or in the Prosthetic Infirmary three hours a 
day for six days each week, giving him 576 hours of practice each year. 

The Massachusetts General Hospital. — During the past year, six thou- 
sand two hundred and fifty-one patients were treated in the wards, five 
thousand four hundred and twenty-four cases were treated in the accident 
ward, and there were one hundred forty-seven thousand four hundred and 
twenty-eight visits to the out-patient departments. Patients are received 
from all parts of the United States and the Provinces, and are visited by 
the students, with the attending physicians and surgeons, or demonstrated 
in the amphitheatres. Operations are numerous, and are performed in 
the amphitheatre. Clinics in the following special branches have been 
established in connection Avith the out-patient department : Dermatology, 
Laryngology, Diseases of the Nervous System, Children's Diseases, Ortho- 
pedics, Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System, and Syphilology. 

The Boston City Hospital. — During the past year, eighteen thousand 
and seventy-seven cases were treated in its wards, and there were two hun- 
dred and eight thousand one hundred and ninety-seven visits in its various 
out-patient departments. The medical wards always contain many cases 
of acute diseases, and changes are taking place constantly. The opportu- 
nities for seeing fractures, injuries, and traumatic cases of all kinds are 
excellent, since, on an average, forty-nine thousand street accidents are 
treated yearly. Surgical operations are performed in the amphitheatre. 
There are special services for diseases of women, of the eye, the ear, the 
skin, and the nose and throat. Diseases of women and of the nervous sys- 
tem are also largely treated in the out-patient department. Clinical instruc- 
tion is given by the physicians and surgeons two or more times a week. 

In this hospital, the facilities for witnessing Operative Surgery are 
unsurpassed. Twice a week operations are performed in the presence 
of the class. The number of these operations is large, reaching over four 
thousand nine hundred a year. The variety is great, embracing every sur- 
gical disease and injury, including the surgical operations on the eye 
and ear. 

The Boston Dispensary. — About one hundred and ten thousand visits 
were made by out-patients at this charity during the past year. Students 
have ample and excellent opportunity for seeing practical work in the 
diagnosis and treatment of cases illustrating the various branches of Med- 
icine and Surgery. 



65 

The Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. — Over sixty- 
one thousand visits were made by patients at this institution during the 
past year. These cases present every variety of disease of the ear and 
eye, and supply a large number of operations. A new and enlarged 
hospital, considered to be one of the best of its kind in the world, has been 
erected on land adjoining the Massachusetts General Hospital. It is 
believed that this building will provide adequately for the proper treatment 
of the constantly increasing number of patients. 

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS 

The College Library at Cambridge is open to students, and also the 
Library of the Boston Medical Library Association, which has a dental 
section containing a large and very complete collection of dental literature. 
It includes the libraries of the American Academy of Dental Science 
and the Massachusetts Dental Society. There is a good reference library 
of modern books, including encyclopaedias, systems, etc. The Library 
is open daily, except Sundays and holidays, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. It is 
also open Tuesday and Friday evenings from 7 to 10, except during July 
and August. 

The Dental School Library for reference only also contains about 
2,991 well selected volumes to which the students and graduates of the 
School have free access. 

The Boston Public Library is open to students who are inhabitants of 
Boston. Students, not inhabitants of Boston, who have filed a bond at the 
Bursar's office, or deposited with the Bursar the sum of fifty dollars, may 
also use this Library. 

The Boston Medical Library, No. 8 The Fenway, contains about 84,000 
bound volumes and 56,000 pamphlets, and nearly 650 current periodicals 
are on file. This very valuable Library is open to those who desire to 
consult medical literature, on week days from 9.30 a.m. to 10 p.m., on 
Saturdays till 6 p.m. 

The Dental Museum is in charge of Dr. Waldo Elias Boardman, 
Curator. It contains about 3000 specimens, and offers unusual facilities 
for study of the teeth. The pathological anatomy of the teeth is shown 
by more than 2000 specimens, among which are over 200 dissected teeth 
showing formations of secondary dentine in the pulp cavity, and also 
many other rare specimens of great value. There are 700 other speci- 
mens of human and comparative anatomy, illustrating a wide range of 
knowledge. 



66 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Frederick Sheldon Fund for Travelling Fellowships ; 
the University received in 1909 the sum of three hundred and forty- 
six thousand four hundred and fifty-eight dollars and seventy cents from 
the residuary bequest of Mrs. Amey Richmond Sheldon, and in 1910 
the further sum of eight thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars frorq 
the same bequest, to establish, in memory of Mrs. Sheldon's husband, a 
member of the Class of 1842, the Frederick Sheldon Fund, " the income 
thereof to be applied in the discretion of and under rules to be prescribed 
by the President and Fellows ... to the further education of students 
of promise and standing in the University by providing them with facilities 
for further education by travel after graduation or by establishing travel- 
ling scholarships." The income of this fund is at present about fifteen 
thousand dollars. 

By a vote of the President and Fellows, a Committee of seven persons 
has been appointed to administer the Frederick Sheldon Fund for travel- 
ling scholarships. The income is not to be assigned in scholarships of 
fixed amounts, but "on recommendation to the Committee from the 
various Departments and Schools, to be assigned as the Committee shall 
deem most expedient for purposes of investigation or study either in this 
country — outside Harvard University — or abroad." 

The Committee consists of the Deans of the Faculty of Arts and 
Sciences, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School 
of Business Administration, the Divinity School, the Law School, the 
Medical School, and the Bussey Institution. 

Application in behalf of a student in any School, Division, or Depart- 
ment of the University must be made through the Dean or Chairman of 
that School, Division, or Department, to the Chairman of the Committee, 
Dean L. B. R. Briggs, and may be made at any time. 

The Charles Elliott Perkins Scholarships ; three undergraduate 
scholarships and one graduate scholarship, with an income of three 
hundred dollars each. In [1909, thirty thousand dollars was received 
from Mrs. Charles Elliott Perkins, of Burlington, Iowa, "in trust 
for the establishment of scholarships in Harvard University for students 
from Iowa, the scholarships to be forever known and designated as the 
* Charles Elliott Perkins Scholarships.' 

". . . . It is my desire that the benefits of this foundation shall be 
open to those desiring a so-called classical or liberal education, and to 
those desiring to fit themselves for the professions ; and especially that 
young men who intend to pursue technical studies in preparation for a 
career in business or engineering may be encouraged by these' scholar- 



67 

ships to precede their technical studies, or combine them, with such 
liberal studies as shall contribute to their breadth of view, sympathy with 
all humane interests, and capacity for ultimate leadership. In fulfilment 
of the purpose above described, I desire the income of the fund to be 
divided among four or more scholarships, in accordance with the follow- 
ing terms : — 

**I. One undergraduate scholarship of at least $300, to be offered 
annually, upon his graduation from an Iowa high school, to a bona fide 
resident of that part of the State of Iowa which is now served by the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway system. 

"II. Two undergraduate scholarships of $300 each, to be offered 
annually to students from Iowa high schools. . . . 

"III. One graduate scholarship of $300, to be offered each year to a 
graduate of an Iowa college or university in any of the graduate or pro- 
fessional departments of Harvard University. 

The Princeton Fellowship; with a stipend of four hundred and 
fifty dollars. From a graduate of Princeton University, to be awarded to 
a graduate of that University studying in any department of Harvard 
University . 

These scholarships and gratuities are awarded to such men among those 
applying for and needing assistance as give evidence of having done the 
best work either in this School or in a preparatory course elsewhere. 

Students who have not been able to obtain scholarships often find time 
and opportunity to do outside work of various kinds in the city. 

The Director of. Scholarships will aid deserving students in obtaining 
work. Certain loan funds not enumerated above are at his disposal. 
Students requiring aid should visit the Director as soon as possible to 
discuss with him their financial needs. The Director will also act in 
advisory capacity with the students in any matters not intimately associated 
with the curriculum. 

Blank forms, on which all applications for pecuniary aid must be made, 
may be obtained of the Director of Scholarships. 

THE HARlilET NEWELL LOWELL SOCIETY FOR DENTAL 

RESEARCH 

In 1907, Miss Harriet Newell Lowell bequeathed to the Harvard 
Dental School a sum of money, the interest to be applied each year to 
dental research. In addition to the appointment of a special research 
worker and a research committee of four men, the Administrative Board 
formed the Harriet Newell Lowell Society for Dental Research. The 
object of the Society is to interest the students in research. Its president 



68 

and a majority of its executive committee are students, and meetings 
are held in the School building. A well-equipped research laboratory is 
open for the use of the students and teachers who are interested in 
scientific investigation. 

WARREN ANATOMICAL MUSEUM IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The Warren Anatomical Museum was founded in 1847 by John Collins 
Warren, of the College Class of 1797, Adjunct Professor of Anatomy 
and Surgery from 1809 to 1815, Hersey Professor of Anatomy and 
Surgery from 1815 to 1847, Professor Emeritus from 1847 to his death in 
1856, son to John Warren, the first Hersey Professor of Anatomy and 
Surgery. This important Museum is open to students in the School, and 
its collections are used in demonstration of the lectures. Its Curator is 
Dr. William Fiske Whitney. 

The collection has about ten thousand specimens, illustrating both 
normal and pathological anatomy and materia medica. These are placed 
in the hands of the student at any time during the day, upon application 
to the Curator. 

Besides dissections and serial sections of many bones, the anatomical 
collection includes many corrosive preparations, plaster and papier mache 
models of bones, organs, and various parts of the body, and frozen 
sections. 

The pathological collection is being constantly enlarged by the addition 
of numerous specimens, preserved in their natural colors by Kaiserling's 
method. 

EXAMINATIONS 

For the year 1917-18 

The final examination in every required subject is held at the close 
either of the first or of the second term of the school year. The exami- 
nation, therefore, in every subject occurs once a year, but an opportunity 
to make up failures in examinations is offered at the opening of the school 
year. The examination in certain studies of the first year is held at mid- 
year only, and is for those who are members of the School at the time, 
and for those entitled to apply for the degree, provided they have failed 
previously in those subjects. The June examination is only for those 
who are members of the School at the time, and for those entitled to apply 
for the degree. The Septemher examination is for conditioned students 
or for applicants for advanced standing. In some branches a portion 
of the examination consists of practical work in the laboratory. 



69 

The amount of time credited to each examination is as follows : — 

First Year. — Biology (3 hrs.), Anatomy (3 hrs.), Histology and Em- 
bryology (3 hrs.), Chemistry (3 hrs.), General Pathology (3 hrs.). 

Second Year. — Physiology* (3 hrs.). Dental Pathology (3 hrs.), 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics (2 hrs.), Operative Dentistry (2 hrs.). 
Bacteriology* (1 hr.). Chemistry (2 hrs.), Prosthetic Dentistry (2 hrs.). 

Third Year. — Operative Dentistry (2 hrs.). Applied Therapeutics (2 
hrs.), Surgical Pathology and Surgery (3 hrs.). Prosthetic Dentistry (2 
hrs.), Orthodontia (2 hrs.). Crown and Bridge Work (2 hrs.). 

In addition to the above examinations each student is required : — 
To dissect three parts of. the body to the satisfaction of the Demon- 
strators ; 
To satisfactorily complete the required specimens of Prosthetic Dentistry 

for the Junior and Senior years ; 
To demonstrate his ability to meet satisfactorily the practical requirements 

in Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry ; 
To successfully carry on the treatment of at least two cases of irregulari- 
ties of the teeth. 

No student may advance with his class until he has passed a satisfactory 
examination in a majority of the studies already pursued. 

No student is admitted to the third-year class in practical Operative and 
Prosthetic Dentistry until he has shown reasonable proficiency in the 
work of the second year. 

No student may enter the second-year class until he has passed all the 
required examinations for entrance to the School. 

Students who fail in any subject may present themselves in that subject 
again at the next regular examination. After two failures to pass in any 
subject, a student must give notice twenty-four hours in advance, at the 
Dean's office, of his intention to take each subsequent examination in that 
subject, and pay a charge of three dollars. 

EEQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

In or hefore June^ 1919 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine {Dentariae Medicinae 
Docioris) may be conferred upon any candidate of adult age, and of good 
moral character, who has passed all the required examinations. He 
must also give evidence of having studied Medicine or Dentistry in some 
recognized school three full years, the last continuous year of which must 
have been spent at this School. 

* The examinations in these subjects are held at the end of the first half-year. 



70 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine cum laude will be given to 
candidates who have pursued a complete three years' course in this School 
and obtained not less than eighty per cent in Practical Operative and 
Prosthetic Dentistry and an average of eighty per cent or over in all 
other required examinations. 

The course is a graded one of three continuous years. Graduates from 
other reputable Dental Schools Avhose Course of Instruction consists of 
three years of nine months each may obtain the degree of Doctor of 
Dental Medicine by spending one year in the School and passing the 
required examinations. 

The right to take the examinations, as well as the privilege of con- 
tinuing membership in the School, is conditioned upon regular attendance 
upon lectures, infirmary practice, and laboratory exercises. 

Candidates for the degree are obliged to apply for the same in writing, 
on blanks furnished at the Dean's office, on or before May 1 of the year 
in which they propose to graduate. 

INSTRUMENTS 

With the exception of extracting instruments, lathes, and vulcanizers, 
blow-pipes and articulators, each student will be required to furnish his 
own instruments, and appliances for both laboratory and operating room. 

At the beginning of the second year a complete list of instruments 
required for use in both the Operative and Prosthetic Departments is fur- 
nished by the School, and each student is required to provide himself with 
the instruments enumerated upon the lists before beginning his work. 
The cost of these instruments, including the dental engine, is about one 
hundred and fifty dollars. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

For Studeyits who entered in or before September, 1916 

There are no fees for matriculation, for the diploma, for the demon- 
strators, nor for materials used in the infirmary or prosthetic laboratory. 
The tuition fee for the second and third years is one hundred and fifty 
dollars each, in two payments of ninety dollars and sixty dollars; and 
for any subsequent year, fifty dollars. 

During the second and third years a deposit of ten dollars is required to 
cover any loss or breakage of appliances in the infirmary and prosthetic 
laboratory. The balances of these deposits are returnable at the end of 
the year on application to the Bursar. In the second year there is a fee 
of five dollars for Chemistry and a fee of three dollars for Bacteriology. 



71 

A deposit of two dollars with the Dean of the Medical School will entitle 
a student to the use of a locker in the Medical School buildings during the 
first year. 

A student who wishes to rent a microscope of the School can do so upon 
payment of four to six dollars a half-year. 

For the Four -Year Course beginning September, 1917 

There are no fees for matriculation, for the diploma, for the demon- 
strators, nor for materials used in the infirmary or prosthetic laboratory. 
For the first year of a student's membership in the School, the tuition fee 
is two hundred dollars, in two payments of one hundred and twenty dol- 
lars and eighty dollars ; for a half-year only, one hundred and twenty 
dollars; for the second, third, and fourth years, one hundred and fifty 
dollars each, in two payments of ninety dollars and sixty dollars ; and 
for any subsequent year, fifty dollars. 

During the first year there are the following additional expenses : Three 
dollars for each of the two parts required for dissection ; three dollars for 
laboratory materials in Histology ; ten dollars for biological material ; and 
a maximum of fifteen dollars a year for chemical material, in addition 
to the charge for breakage of glass apparatus. Students are required to 
deposit with the Bursar* six dollars to cover Anatomy charges, three dollars 
for Histology, and twenty-five dollars for Chemistry and Biology. During 
the second, third, and fourth years a deposit of ten dollars is required to 
cover any loss or breakage of appliances in the infirmary and prosthetic 
laboratory. The balances of these deposits are returnable at the end of 
the year on application to the Bursar. In the second year there is also a 
fee of ten dollars for Chemistry, three dollars for Bacteriology, and three 
dollars for Oral Anatomy. 

A deposit of two dollars with the Dean of the Medical School will entitle 
a student to the use of a locker in the Medical School buildings during the 
first year. 

» A student who wishes to rent a microscope of the School can do so 
upon payment of four to six dollars a half-year. 

Special students, admitted at the discretion of the Dean to the courses 
in Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry for the whole or any portion of the 
academic year, pay a fee of fifty dollars for each course. 

The student's general expenses may be reduced, in accordance with his 
means, to the standard which prevails in other cities. A list of boarding 
places, at various prices, can be obtained at the rooms of the Young Men's 
Christian Union, No. 48 Boylston Street, Boston. 

' * The Bursar's office is in Dane Hall, Harvard Square, Cambridge. Hours 9-1, 



72 

Students' expenses may also be reduced by occupying rooms in the 
College dormitories in Cambridge. Information in regard to College 
rooms may«be obtained after April 6 upon application to the Bursar. 

At Memorial Hall, Cambridge, the cost of board is expected not to 
exceed $5.50 a week. 

At Foxcroft Hall, Cambridge, meals are served a la carte, at a cost 
which averages about $3.50 a week. Application should be made early 
to the Auditor, Foxcroft Hall. 

Any student who lives in a College room, or boards at Memorial Hall 
or at Foxcroft Hall, must file a bond in the sum of four hundred dollars; 
or deposit four hundred dollars in money or United States Bonds ; or 
deposit fifty dollars as security, pay his tuition-fees in advance as above, 
pay in advance the full year's rent of any room that may be assigned to 
him, and make a deposit with the Bursar as security for the payment of 
his board. In the case of Memorial Hall the deposit for board may be 
made each week at the rate of $6.00, or it may be made less frequently in 
multiples of that figure. In the case of Foxcroft Hall, the deposit, made 
in sums of $5.00 or multiples thereof, must be such as to maintain con- 
stantly in the Bursar's hands a balance in excess of ten dollars. 

Stillman Infirmary Fee 

Not later than October 1 in each academic year, any student may pay 
to the Bursar the sum of four dollars for the maintenance of the Stillman 
Infirmary ; and, on the order of a physician, every student who has taken 
advantage of this opportunity will be given, in case of sickness, in return 
for the fee, a bed in a ward, board, and ordinary nursing for a period not 
exceeding two weeks in any one academic year. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

For Students registering in September^ 1917 

Each first-year student is required to pay to the Bursar punctually at the^ 
beginning of the academic year, without the presentation of a bill, the 
sum of one hundred and fifty-four dollars ; in like manner, each second- 
year student is required to pay one hundred and eight dollars ; and each 
third-year student, one hundred dollars ; each student entering any sub- 
sequent year is required to pay, in the same manner, fifty dollars. The 
remainder of the tuition fee — eighty dollars for the first-year students 
and sixty dollars for the second and third-year students — must be paid 
to the Bursar on or before January 31. Each student whose dues remain 
unpaid on the day fixed for their payment is required at once to cease 
attending lectures and using laboratories or making use of any other 



73 

privileges as a student until his financial relations with the University 
have been arranged satisfactorily to the Bursar. Failure to comply 
with this rule is deemed cause for final separation of the student from the 
University. 

Every student is required to file with the Bursar on his entrance to the 
School a bond of fifty dollars^ executed by two suificient bondsmen 
(one of whom must be a citizen of the United States), or to deposit 
fifty dollars in money, to cover the loss or injury of any property belong- 
ing to the University, or for which it is responsible. Blank forms of 
bonds may be obtained from the Bursar. No officer or student of the 
University is accepted as a bondsman. Students will be held responsible 
for the payment of fees until they have notified the Dean, in writing, 
of their intention to withdraw from the School. No degree can he con- 
f erred until all dues to the School are discharged. 

Whenever a student is obliged to withdraw from the School before the 
last four weeks of a half-year for no misdemeanor, but for good and 
sufficient reason, to be determined in all cases by the Administrative 
Board, it shall be recommended that he be entitled to a remission of 
three-fourths of the amount due for that portion of the time during which 
he receives no instruction. This remission will date from the reception 
by the Dean of a written notice of the student's withdrawal from the 
School. 

Students, on joining the School, and at the beginning of each school 
year, must enter their names with the Dean of the School. They are 
expected to register on the first day of the academic year, the Monday 
'preceding the last Wednesday in September. 



74 



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75 



TABULAR VIEW — 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 
October 



SECOND YEAR — First Half -Year 





Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 






Mat. Medica 




Dent. Path. ,L. 


Op. Dent., L. 


Pros. Dent. 






L. 




Thorn a. 


Dill. 


L. 






O'Connell. 




H.M.S.E-221. 


H.M.S.E-221. 


Beckford. 






H.M.S.E-221. 








H.M.S. 


9 






• 






E-221. 




Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pros. Lab. 




Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Section A. 




Section A. 


Section B. 


Section A. 


Section B. 


Section A. 


Dort. 




Wyman. 


Slack. 


Thomson. 


Carter. 


Safford. 


Pract. Oper. 




C. E. Stevens. 


O'Connell. 


Wallace. 


Mackintosh. 


McGourty. 


Dentistry. 




Lockwood. 


Burn ham. 


Emerson. 


Loveland. 


Curtis. 


Section B. 




Emerson. 


Wood. 




Ringer. 


C. J. Smith. 


White. 


10 




Emerson. 




Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Perrin. 
Emerson. 




Pros. Lab. 


Pros. Lab. 


Pros. Lab. 


Pros. Lab. 


Pros. Lab. 






Section B. 


Section A. 


Section B. 


Section A. 


Section B. 






Eld red. 


Loomer. 


Sullivan. 


Malmstrom. 


Chambers. 




to 


Hurley. 


Lord. 


Ellard. 


Nutter. 


Rogers. 






B. S. Stevens. 


Terra. 


Glazier. 


Wade. 


Leslie. 


Extracting 
and 




Peacock. 


Catlieron. 


Goetz. 


Goetz. 


Beckford. 




Beckford. 


Severy. 


Beckford. 


Beckford. 




Anaesthesia 


1 




Beckford. 


• 






Ring. 






1 1 
Bacteriology. Lectures. Building D-2. 







2-3 




Daily, except Saturdays. 
Medical School Building. 






3 




Bacteriology. Laboratory. 






to 




Daily, except Saturdays. 






H 




Medical School Building. 







76 



TABULAR VIEW — 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 
Noveraber 



SECOND YEAR — First Half- Year 





Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 


9 




Mat. Medica 

L. 

O'Connell. 

H.M.S.E-221. 




Dent. Path., L. 

Tlioma. 
H.M.S. E-221. 


Op. Dent. ,L. 

Dill. 
H.M.S.E-221. 


Pros. Dent. 

L. 

Beckford. 

H.M.S. 

E-221. 


10 
to 

1 


Pract. Oper. 

Dentistry. 

Section B. 

Wyman. 

Lockwood. 

Hayman. 

C.E.Stevens. 

Emerson. 

Pros. Lab. 
Section A. 

Eldred. 

Hurley. 

B. S. Stevens. 

Peacock. 

Beckford. 


Pract. Oper. 
Dentistry. 
Section A. 
O'Connell. 
Burnham. 

Wood. 

Slack. 
Emerson. 

Pros. Lab. 

Section B. 

Loomer. 

Lord. 

Terra. 

Catheron. 

Beckford. 


Pract. Oper. 
Dentistry. 
Section B. 
Thomson. 
Wallace. 
Emerson. 

Pros. Lab. 

Section A. 

Sullivan. 

Elhird. 

Glazier. 

McCarty. 

Beckford. 


Pract. Oper. 

Dentistry. 

Section A. 

Mackintosh. 

Carter. 

Loveland. 

Ringer. 

Emerson. 

Pros. Lab. 

Section B. 

Malmstrom. 

Nutter. 

Wade. 

Goetz. 

Beckford. 


Pract. Oper. 

Dentistry. 

Section B. 

McGourty. 

SafFord . 

Curtis. 

C. J. Smith. 

Emerson. 

Pros. Lab. 
Section A. 
Chambers. 

Rogers. 

Leslie. 
Beckford. 


Pros. Lab. 
Section B. 

Dort. 

Pract. Oper. 

Dentistry. 

Section A. 

White. 

Perrin. 

Emerson. 

Extracting 

and 
Anaesthesia 

Ring. 

1 




November. 




2-3 


Bacteriology. Lectures. Building D-2. 
Daily, except Saturdays. 
Harvard Medical School. 




3 
to 


Bacteriology. Laboratory. 
Daily, except Saturdays. 
Harvard Medical School. 





77 



TABULAR VIEW — 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 
December — January 





Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 






Mat. Medica 




Dent.Path.jL. 


Op. Dent. ,L. 


Pros. Dent. 






L. 




Thoma. 


Dill. 


L. 






O'Connell. 




H.M.S. E-221. 


H.M.S.E-221. 


Beckford. 


9 




H.M.S.E-221. 








H.M.S. 






• 






E-221. 




Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. 




Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Oper. 




Wyman. 


Wood. 


Sec. B. — Dec. 


Carter. 


Safibrd. 


Dentistry. 


10 


C. E. Stevens. 


O'Connell. 


Sec. A. — Jan. 


Ringer. 


McGourty. 


Sec. B. -Dec. 




Hayman. 


Burnham. 


Thomson. 


Mackintosh. 


Curtis. 


Sec. A. -J an. 




Lockwood. 


Slack. 


Wallace. 


Loveland. 


C. J. Smith. 


Perrin. 




Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Emerson. 


White. 


to 






Pros. Lab. 

Sec. A. — Dec. 

Sec. B. — Jan. 

Shannon. 

Giblin, Jr. 


Extracting 




Pros. Lab. 

Sec. A. -Dec. 

Sec. B.-Jan. 

Dort. 

Extracting 


1 








and 




and 








Anaesthesia. 




Anaesthesia 










J. M. Smith. 




Ring. 




Pros. Dent. 


Pros. Dent. 


Pros. Dent. 


iPros. Dent. 


Pros. Dent. 






Lab. 


Lab. 


Lab. 


Lab. 


Lab. 






Eldred. 


Loomer. 


Sullivan. 


Malmstrom. 


Chambers. 




2 


Hurley. 


Catlieron. 


Ellard. 


Nutter. 


Rogers. 




B. S. Stevens. 


Lord. 


Glazier. 


Wade. 


Leslie. 






Peacock. 


Terra. 


McCarty. 


Goetz. 


Beckford. 






Beckford. 


Severy. 
Beckford. 


Beckford. 


Beckford. 
1 Porcelain 






to 








Work. 

Hadley 

Warner. 








Extracting 


Extracting 


Extracting 


Extracting 


Extracting 






and 


and 


and 


and 


and 




5 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 






Midgley. 


Wolfe. 


Herder. 


Norwood. 


Farrington. 





1 In sections. 



78 



TABULAR VIEW — 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 



1 



SECOND YEAR — Second Half-Year 



.^. 


Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 




Clin. Chem. 


Mat. Medica 


Clin. Chem. 


Dent.Path.jL. 


Op. Dent. ,L. 


Prosthetic 




H. C. Smith. 


L. 


H. C. Smith. 


Brackett. 


Dill. 


Dentistry, 




Com. Feb. 11. 


O'Connell. 


Com. Feb. 13. 


H.M.S. E-221. 


H.M.S. E-221. 


L. 




8.30 


H.M.S. E-221. 


8.30 






Beckford. 


9 












H.M.S. 








• 






E-221. 




Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


i Pract. 


Pract. Oper. 


Pract. Oper. 


1 Pract. 




Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Oper. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Oper. 


10 


Wyman. 


Wood. 


Dentistry. 


Mackintosh. 


SafFord. 


Dentistry. 




C.E. Stevens. 


O'Connell 


Thomson. 


Carter. 


McGourty. 


Perrin. 




Lockwood. 


Burnham. 


Wallace. 


Ringer. 


Emerson. 


White. 




Hayman. 


Slack. 


Emerson. 


Loveland. 


Curtis. 






Emerson. 


Emerson. 




Emerson. 


C. J. Smith. 


2 Pros. Lab. 
Dort. 


to 






2 Pract. Pros. 
Dentistry. 
Shannon. 


Extracting 

and 

Anaesthesia. 




Extracting 

and 
Anaesthesia 


1 






Giblin, Jr. 


J. M. Smith 




Ring. 




Pract. Pros. 


Pract. Pros. 


Pract. Pros. 


Pract. Pros. 


Pract. Pros. 






Dentistr}'. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 




c% 


Eldred. 


Loomer. 


Sullivan. 


Malmstrom. 


Chambers. 




2 


Hurley. 


Catheron. 


EUard. 


Nutter. 


Rogers. 






B. S. Stevens. 


Lord. 


Glazier. 


Wade. 


Leslie. 






Peacock. 


Terra. 


McCarty. 


Goetz. 


Beckford. 






Beckford. 


Severy. 
Beckford. 


Beckford. 


Beckford. 








Extracting 


Extracting 


Extracting 


1 Porcelain 


Extracting 




to 


and 


and 


and 


Work. 


and 






Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Hadley. 


Anaesthesia. 






Midgley. 


Wolfe. 


Herder. 


Warner. 
Extracting 


Farrington. 




5 








and 

Anaesthesia. 

Norwood. 






1 Sec 


tionB, Februa 


ry and April ; 


Section A, Mai 


•ch and May. 






2 Sec 


tion A, Februa 


ry and April; 


Section B, Ma 


rch and May. 





I 



79 



TABULAR VIEW — 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 



THIRD YEAR — October and November 





Monday. 


Tuesday . 


Wednesday. 
Orthodontia. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 




Op. Dent.L. 


Surgery, L. 


Prosthetic 


Syphilology, 


Op. Dent. 




Potter. 


Monks. 


L. 


Dent. L. 


L. 


L. 




n.M.S.A.201. 


H.M.S.A-201. 


Baker. 


Russell. 


CM. Smith. 


E.H.Smith. 








H.M.S.A-201. 


H.M.S.A-201. 


Com. Sept. 28 


H.M.S. 









Crown and 


or 


H.M.S.A-201. 


A-201. 








Bridge Work 


Conferences 


C. & B. Dem. 


or 








Cooke. 


H.D. S. 


Hovestad. 


Clinical 








Com. Nov. 1. 




Com. Oct. 5. 


Conference 








• 






H.D.S. 




Prosthetic 


^OralSurgery. 


Crown and 


1 Porcelain 


Prosthetic 


Orthodontia 




Dentistry. 


Clinic. 


Bridge Work. 


Work. 


Dentistry. 


Clinic. 




Lab. 


Monks. 


Clinic. 


Clinic. 


Clark. 


Baker. 


10 


Langley. 


Miner. 


Cooke. 


Hadley. 


Calder. 


Howe. 




Myerson. 


Taft. 


J. F. Hove- 


Nesbett. 


Tashjian. 


W.C.Miner. 




Galim. 


1 Prosthetic 
Dentistry. 


stad. 
Andrews. 


Oldham. 


Cushman. 


Fernald. 
Hatfield. 






Lab. 


Brigham. 


1 Prosthetic 




Blumenthal. 


to 




Weston. 


F.W. Hove- 


Dentistry. 




Gove. 






Roberts. 


stad. 


Lab. 




Bonin. 






Cavanagh. 


Hay den. 


Ruelberg. 










Russell. 


Flagg. 


Marsh. 








Rill an. 




Peters. 


Webster. 




Extracting 


1 


Russell. 




Pros. Dent. 

Lab. 

Shannon. 

Giblin. 


Rihan. 
Russell. 


Russell. 


and 

Anaesthesia 

Ring. 


2 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 






Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 






Blaisdell. 


Spinney. 


Pike. 


Furfey. 


Elliott. 






Chase . 


W. A. Davis. 


Stone. 


Taylor. 


Lawton. 






Timlin. 


Pro van. 


McCullagh. 


Crowley. 


S.H.Vaughan 






Mallett. 


Ryder. 


Ashland. 


Whitchurch. 


Heap. 






Carle. 


Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Jameson. 


Emerson. 






Emerson. 






Emerson. 








Extracting 


Extracting 


Clin. 


Extracting 


Extracting 






and 


and 


Pyorrhoea. 


and 


and 






Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Stanley. 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 






Midgley. 


Wolfe. 


C.B.Vaughan 

Extracting 

and 

Anaesthesia. 

Herder. 


Norwood. 


Farrington. 






Orthodontia. 


Orthodontia 




4 




Baker. 

Howe. 

W. C. Miner. 


Baker. 

Howe. 

W. C. Miner. 






to 




Fernald. 




Fernald. 






5 




Hatfield. 

Blumenthal. 

Gove. 

Bonin. 




Hatfield. 

Blumenthal. 

Gove. 

Bonin. 







1 In sections. 



80 



TABULAR VIEW— 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 



THIRD YEAR — December — January 





Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 




Op. Dent. L. 


Surgery, L. 


Orthodontia 


Prosthetic 


Applied 


Op. Dent. 




Potter. 


Monks. 


L. 


Dent. L. 


Therapeutics 


L. 




H.M.S.A-201. 


H.M.S.A-201. 


Baker. 


Russell. 


L. 


E.H.Smith. 








H.M.S.A-201. 


H.M.S. A-201. 


Stanton. 


H.M.S. 


9 






Crown and 


or 


H.M.S.A-201. 


A.201. 








Bridge Work 


Conferences 


January 4 


or 








Cooke. 


H.D.S. 


to 


Clinical 








H.M.S.A.-201 




March 1. 


Conference 








Alternating. 






H.D.S. 




Prosthetic 


^Oral Surgery. 


Crown and 


1 Porcelain 


Prosthetic 


Operative 




Dentistry. 


Clinic. 


Bridge Work 


Work. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 




Lab. 


Monks. 


Clinic. 


Clinic. 


Clark. 


Emerson. 


10 


Langley. 


Miner. 


Cooke. 


Hadley. 


Calder. 






Gahm. 


Taft. 


J. r. Hove- 


Nesbett. 


Tashjian. 






Myerson. 


1 Prosthetic 
Dentistry. 
Lab. 


stad. 

Peters. 

Andrews. 


Oldham. 

1 Prosthetic 

Dentistry 


Cushman. 




to 




Weston. 

Roberts. 

Cavanagh. 


Brigham. 

E. W. Hove- 

stad. 


Lab. 

Ruelberg. 

Marsh. 










Russell. 


Hayden. 

Elagg. 


Webster. 
Rihan. 




Extracting 
and 


1 


Rihan. 
Russell. 




Pros. Dent. 

Lab. 

Shannon. 

Giblin. 


Russell. 


Russell. 


Anaesthesia 
Ring. 


2 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 






Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistrv. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 






Blaisdell. 


W. A. Davis. 


Pike. 


Furfey. 


Elliott. 






Chase. 


Spinney. 


Stone. 


Taylor. 


Lawton. 






Timlin. 


Pro van. 


McCullagh. 


Crowley. 


S.H.Yaughan 






Mallett. 


Ryder. 


Ashland. 


Whitchurch. 


Heap. 






Carle. 


Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Jameson. 


Emerson. 






Emerson. 




Clin. 


Emerson. 








Extracting 

and 

Anaesthesia. 


Extracting 

and 

Anaesthesia. 


1 Pyorrhoea. 

Stanley. 

C.B.Yaughan 

Extracting 

and 


Extracting 

and 
Anaesthesia. 


Extracting 

and 
Anaesthesia. 






Midgley. 


Wolfe. 


Norwood. 


Farrington. 










Anaesthesia. 
Herder. 












Orthodontia. 


Orthodontia. 








Baker. 






Baker. 






i 


Howe. 






Howe. 




4 




W. C. Miner. 






W. C. Miner. 






Fernald. 


/ 




Fernald. 




to 




Hatfield. 






Hatfield. 




5 




Blumenthal. 
Gove. 
Bonin. 






Blumenthal. 
Gove. 
Bonin. 





1 In sections. 



81 



TABULAR VIEW — 1917-18 

(Three-Year Course) 







THIRD YEAR — February — June 






Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wednesday. 


Thursday. 


Friday. 


Saturday. 




Op. Dent. L. 


Surgery, L. 


Orthodontia 


Prosthetic 


Neurology. 


Op. Dent. 




Potter. 


Monks. 


L. 


Dent. L. 


E. W. Taylor. 


L. 




H.M.S.A-201. 


H.M.S.A-201. 


Baker. 


Russell. 


4 lectures. 


E.H.Smith. 








H.M.S.A-201. 


H.M.S.A-201. 


*H.M.S.A-201. 


H.M.S. 


/\ 






Crown and 


or 


Com. Mar. 8. 


A-201. 


9 






Bridge Work 


Conferences 


Roentgen- 


or 








Cooke. 
H.M.S.A-201. 

Alternating. 


H.D.S. 


ology 
E. C. Cum- 

mings. 
7 lectures. 


Clinical 

Conference 

H.D.S. 




Prosthetic 


lOral Surgery 


Crown and 


1 Porcelain 


Prosthetic 


Operative 




Dentistry. 


Clinic. 


Bridge Work. 


Work. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 




Lab. 


Monks. 


Clinic. 


Clinic. 


Clark. 


Emerson. 


10 


Langley. 


Miner. 


Cooke. 


Hadley. 


Calder. 






Myerson. 


Taft. 


J. F. Hove- 


Nesbett. 


Tashjian. 






Gahm. 


1 Prosthetic 


stad. 


Oldham. 


Cushman. 






Rihan. 


Dentistry. 


Brigham. 










Russell. 


Lab. 


Andrews. 








to 




Weston. 


Peters. 


^ Prosthetic 




Extracting 






Roberts. 


F, W. Hove- 


Dentistry 




and 






Cavanagh. 


stad. 


Lab. 




Anaesthesia 






Russell. 


Hayden. 

Flagg. 


Ruelberg. 
Marsh. 


Russell. 


Ring. 


1 






iPros. Dent. 

Lab. 

Shannon. 

Giblin. 


Webster. 

Rihan. 

Russell. 








Pract. Op. 
Dentistry. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 


Pract. Op. 




2 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 


Dentistry. 






Blaisdell. 


Spinney. 


Pike. 


Furfey. 


Elliott. 






Chase. 


W. A. Davis. 


Stone. 


Taylor. 


Lawton. 






^fc^ A.^ %hV »— ' ^mf • 

Timlin. 


Provan. 


McCullagh. 


Crowley. 


S. H.Vaughan 






Mallett. 


Ryder. 


Ashland. 


Whitchurch. 


Heap. 






Carle. 


Emerson. 


Emerson. 


Jameson. 


Emerson. 






Emerson. 




Clin. 
1 Pyorrhoea. 


Emerson. 
Extracting 


Extracting 






Extracting 


Extracting 


Stanley. 


and 


and 


• 




and 


and 


C.B.Vaughan 


Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia 






Anaesthesia. 


Anaesthesia. 


Extracting 


Norwood. 


Farrington. 






Midgley. 


Wolfe. 


and 

Anaesthesia. 

Herder. 










Orthodontia. 


Orthodontia 








Baker. 






Baker. 








Howe. 






Howe. 




4 




W. C. Miner. 






W. C. Miner. 




to 




Fernald. 






Fernald. 




5 




Hatfield. 

Blumenthal. 

Oove. 

Bonin. 






Hatfield. 
Blumenthal. 
Gove. 
Bonin. 










1 In sectioi 


IS. 







82 



STUDENTS 

Post-Graduate 



NAME 



HOME RESIDENCE 



PRESENT ADDRESS 



Moriarty, Edward Francis, 
D.D.s. {Georgetown Univ.) 
1916. 



Newport, R. L 87 Elm St., Charlestown 



Third Year 

Amado, Alberto, m.d. (Medical 

School of Lisbon, Carcarellos, 

Portugal) 1915, Portugal, 640 Huntington Ave., Boston 

Atwood, Clifford Herman, Astoria, L. /., N. Y. 68 St. Stephen St., Boston 



Bennett, William Eyres, 

Blanchard, Lloyd Henry, 
Blumberg, Louis Everett, 



Bolan, Edmund Joseph, 
Bradway, Earle Leslie, 
Breslow, William, 
Briggs, Leon Royden, 
Brodeur, Adrian Paul, 
Brody, Herman, 
Carnes, Harold Arthur, 
Connelly, William Augustine, 
Co wen, Lewis Augustus, 
CroU, Faber Witman, d.d.s. 

{Univ. of Pennsylvania) 1916, 
Devlin, Francis Paul, 
Dow, Edmund Charles, 
Eisenberg, Moses Joel, 
Elworthy, Arthur William, d.d.s. 



Claremont, W. Australia, 

706 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Uxhridge, 640 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Hempstead, L. I., N, Y. 

201 St. Botolph St., Boston 
Haverhill, 141 Hilldale Ave., Haverhill 
Framingham, 9 Alexander St., Framingham 
Everett, 89 Beach St., Everett 

Providence, R. I. 68 St. Stephen St., Boston 
Brookline, 22 Park Drive, B'kline 

Ansonia, Conn. 23 Claremont P'k, Boston 



Reading, 


199 Lowell St., Reading 


Reading, 


15 Minot St., Reading 


Lynn, 


223 Boston St., Lynn 


Boston, 


100 Gainsboro St., Boston 


Brighton, 


39 Surrey St., Brighton 


Allston, 


40 Harvard Ave., Allston 


Roxhury, 


12 School St., Rox. 



[Boston 



{Univ. of Pennsylvania) 1915, Queensland, Australia, 641 Huntington Ave., 
Ernlund, Carl Helge, a.b. {Coll. 

of Lund, Sweden) 1911, Brunsta, Sweden, 640 Huntington Ave., Boston 



Esterberg, Herbert Ludwig, 
Fernald, John Albert, 
Fine, Samuel, 
Finn, Joseph Thomas, 
Flaschner, Abraham Mark, 



Reading, 20 Walnut St., Reading 

Providence, R.I. 519 Mass. Ave., Boston 
Fitchburg, 95 Intervale St., Rox. 

Dedham, 17 School St., Dedham 

Dorchester, 49 Fabyan St., Dor. 



83 



Fletcher, Roland Ezra, 
Fortin, Charles Percival, 
Goldberg, Samuel, 
Goldinger, Benjamin, 
Gregg, John Joseph, 
Grover, Selig Isaac, 



Madison^ Me. 8 Garrison St., Boston 
New Bedford, 706 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Roxbury, 54 Lawrence Ave., Rox. 

E. Boston, 430 Meridian St., E. Boston 
' Taunt on, 30 Second St., Taunton 

Boston, 78 W. Cedar St., Boston 



Hammond, Orvar Jordan, Somersworth, N. H. 706 Huntington Ave., Boston 



Hoey, Edward Charles, 
Hyde, Lanson James, 
Irving, Rupert Inglis, 
Johnson, Philip Ignatius, 
Kenefick, William James, 
Krupp, Philip, 
Kunker, Frank Earl, 
Kyle, Thomas Joseph, 
LaFayette, Harold Francis, 
Libby, Raymond Wells, 
Long, Ryerson Putnam, 
Macdonald, Harold' Kenny, 
Maclver, Alister Ian, 
Midwood, Louis Calvin, 
Miller, Sigmund, 
Murphy, John Joseph, 
Nakahara, Minoru, d.d.s. (Nip- 
pon Dental Coll., Tokyo) 1915, Tokyo, Japan, 
Nason, Carleton Emerson, Great Barrington, 175 St. Botolph St., Boston 
Nathan, Leonard Daniel, Perth, W. Australia, 706 Huntington Ave., Boston 



Natick, 47 E. Central St., Natick 

Colebrook, N. H. 315 Huntington Ave., Boston 

Moncton, N. B. 8 Garrison St., Boston 

Brookline, 181 Davis Ave., B'kline 

Allston, 9 Bradbury St., Allston 

Roxhury, 42 Munroe St., Rox. 

Albany, N. Y. 875 Huntington Ave., Boston 

Andover, Elm St., Andover 

Walertown, 144 Dexter Ave., Watertown 

Rochester, N. H. 52 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Fredericton, N. B. 183 St. Botolph St., Boston 

Everett, 50 Norwood St., Everett 

Newport, R. I. 108 Harvard St., B'kline 

Providence, R. I. 52 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Salem, 41 Cabot St., Salem 

Lawrence, 37 Milton St., Lawrence 

[Boston 
640 Huntington Ave., 



Perry, Warren Buell, 
Phillips, Russell Samuel, 
Prout, Harold Basil, 
Reiser, Frank Arno, 
Romagosa, Roberto, 
Sagoff, Abraham, 
Selib, Mitchell Samuel, 
Sharpe, Max, 



Boston, 35 Peterboro St., Boston 

Brookline, 57 Perry St., B'kline 

E. Hampden, Me. 7 Greylock R'd, Allston 

Rockville, Conn. 68 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Manzanillo, Cuba, 17 Vancouver St., Boston 



Dorchester, 
Dorchester, 
Boston, 



Smith, Clifton Arthur Hornbrook, Montpelier, Vt. 



Smith, Richard Burton, 
Sproat, Fred Franklin, 
Sturtevant, Herbert Alvan, 
Sugarman, George Bernard, 
Talcoff, William Jacob, 
Tetrault, Eugene Louis, 



17 Fernboro St., Dor. 
60 Wales St., Dor. 
13 Phillips St., Boston 
31 Leyland St., Dor. 
47 Dracut St., Dor. 
93 Binney St., Boston 
Cambridge, 60 Roseland St., Cambridge 
Ellington, Conn. 50 Auburn St., Boston 
Boston, 50 Salem St., Boston 

Southbridge, 450 Mass. Ave., Boston 



Dorchester, 
Boston, 



Towle, Ralph Maurice, 
Vercueil, Alphonso Minnaar, 



84 



Portland, Me. 706 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Middleburg, Transvaal, So. Africa, 

156 W. Newton St., Boston 



Alkazin, Salim Yusof, 
Arnoff, Albert Isadore, 
Batal, Abraham Joseph, 
Berger, Samuel, 



Second Year 

Old Orchard, Me. 112 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Roxhury, 101 Devon St., Rox. 

Lawrence, 407 Elm St., Lawrence 

Cambridge, 122 Berkshire St., Cambridge 
Bolinder, Elmer Reinhold, Swampscott, 92 Middlesex Ave., Swampscott 
Brice, Harry Danforth, Providence, R. I. 690 Angell St., Providence, R. I. 
Burgess, Stanton Leroy, Barre, Vt. 319 Huntington Ave., Boston 

Carp, Harry Morris, Dorchester, 32 Harlem St., Dor. 

Ofessidy, Raymond Paul, Wakefield, 73 Nahant St., Wakefield 

Cohen, Bernard Barnett, Maiden, 33 Harvard St., Maiden 

Cooke, John Wicks, a.b. 1915, Newton Centre, 63 Sumner St., Newton Centre 



Crouch, Paul Webb, 
Cushner, Charles Abraham, 
Cushner, Harry Bertrand, 
Dana, Henry Lester, 
Daniels, Benjamin, 
Darling, Dewey Somers, 
Davidson, Frank Watson, 
Davis, Hazelton Barker, 
Dwyer, George Lawrence, 
Ellsworth, Roy Everett, 
Ettelson, Michael, 
Farrell, George Edward, 
Fine, Louis Matthews, 
Flink, Isadore, 
Fuller, Nathaniel, 
Garry, Frank James, . 
Glazin, Jacob Joseph, 
Granger, Wilfred Clarebert, 
Greenberg, Hyman Lawrence, 
Hale, Myron Eusebius, 
Hall, Gordon, 



Jamaica Plain, 602 Centre St., Jam. PI. 
Boston, 12a Chambers St., Boston 

Boston, 12a Chambers St., Boston 



34 Lawrence Ave., Rox. 

34 Lome St., Dor. 

75 Beacon St., Lowell 

11 Batavia St., Boston 

115a Otis St., Medford 

Manchester, Conn. 544 Mass. Ave., Boston 

Uxbridge, 86 Francis St., Rox. 

Roxhury, 260 Seaver St., Rox. 

Dorchester, 1 Marlowe St., Dor. 

Providence, R. I. 57 Westland Ave., Boston 



Roxhury, 

Dorchester, 

So. Ryegate, Vt. 

Hillsgrove, R. I. 

Medford, 



Roxhury, 

Canton, 

Lawrence, 

Maiden, 

Worcester, 

Dorchester, 

Brookline, 



46 Savin St., Rox. 

57 High St., Canton 

220 Bruce St., Lawrence 

24 Magnolia St., Maiden 

70 Francis St., Rox. 

12 Glen way St., Dor. 

50 Russell St., B'kline 

23 Munroe St., Somer. 



Somerville, 

Harris, Philip Nathaniel, Jamaica Plain, 3294 Washington St., Jam. PI. 
Hill, Leo John, Lawrence, 220 Bruce St., Lawrence 

Hopkins, Russell Norman, Wallingford, Conn. 4 Batavia St., Boston 

Johnson, Allan Macfarlan, a.b. 

{Yale Univ.) 1909, Watertown, 30 Lincoln St., Watertown 



85 



Karcher, Paul Hoffman, 
King, Ronald Martin, 
LaFlamme, Arthur James, 
Lapidus, Frank Ephraim, 
Leather, Seward Spencer, 
LeBaron, Paul Burrows, 
Lockwood, Harold Chester, 



MacDonald, Neil Francis, 

Malkasian, George Durand, 

Maxfield, Carl Webster, a.b. 
(Princeton Univ.) 1915, 



Springfield, 68 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Laeonia, N. H. 274 Brookline Ave., B'kline 

Belmont, 397 Belmont St., Belmont 

Boston, 146 Chambers St., Boston 

Methuen, 645 Hammond St., Chestnut Hill 

Framingham, 138 Hollis St., Framingham 

Warwick Neck, R. I. 

53 St. Stephen St., Boston 

Cambridge, 31 Holyoke St., Cambridge 

Worcester, 44 Roxbury St., Worcester 



Bangor, Me. 706 Huntington Ave., Boston 



Monteagudo, Francisco Corral, Jr. Coruna, Spain, 



Nevins, Joseph William, 
Nugent, John Henry, 
Palumbo, Frank, 
Penn, Jack Benjamin, 
Rae, Robert Gordon, 
Rafferty, Andrew Athy, 
Ray, John Gilbert, Jr. 
Reiser, Waldo Frank, 
Rhodes, Frank Irwin, 
Robinson, Harold Chester, 
Samuels, Alexander, 



Norwich, Conn, 
Boston, 
Roxbury, 
Roxbury, 



Schwartz, Paul Abel, 

Segal, Alfred Edward, 

Shain, Jacob, 

Shohet, Hermon Abram, 

Smith, Paul Rexford, a.b. (Bates 
Coll.) 1915, 

Spooner, Harold Gilman, 

Staples, George Abel, 

Sullivan, Arthur Frank, 

Tashjian, Leon der Sarkis, 

Tatelman, Israel, 

Taylor, George Henry, 

Tingley, Harold Elliott, 

Wallace, David Francis, Jr. 

Weisman, Max Joseph, 

Weston, Henry Fuller, 

Willson, Paul Libby, 

Woisard, Roland Joseph Earnest, Pittston, Pa. 

Yavner, Benjamin, Somerville, 



66 Francis St., Rox. 

45 Apple ton St., Melrose 

86 Francis St., Rox. 

13 Norman St., Boston 

7 Stillman St., Boston 

40 Bridge St., Newton 

70 Francis St., Rox. 

713 River St., Hyde Park 

37 Belvoir R'd, Milton 

181 Walnut St., Chelsea 

Manchester, N. H. 6 Batavia St., Boston 

Paramaribo, South America, 

5 Dell St., Somerville 

112 Howland St., Rox. 
11 Grove St., Boston 
538 Warren St., Rox. 

112 Howland St., Rox. 



Melrose, 

Portland, Me. 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Newton, 

Worcester, 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, 

Chelsea, 



Belfast, Me. 641 Huntington Ave., Boston 

Providence, R. I. 57 Westland Ave., Boston 

Nashua, N. H. 540 Newbury St., Boston 

Evansville, Ind. 40 Holyoke St., Cambridge 

Boston, 532 Tremont St., Boston 

Manchester, N. H. 94 Devon St., Rox. 

Gloucester, 1122 Washington St., Gloucester 

Brighton, 62 Hobson St., Brighton 

Hartford, Conn. 189 Heath St., Rox. 

Boston, 14 No. Anderson St., Boston 

Brockton, 73 Weston St., Brockton 

Saco, Me. 238 Hemenway St., Boston 

86 Francis St., Rox. 
152 Linwood St., Somer. 



86 



First Year 



Abrams, Jacob, 
Adams, Eliot Stephenson, 
Adams, Lester Will, 
Allen, Marion Austin, a.b. {At- 
lanta Univ.) 1915, 
Anastasis, Augustin George, 
Aronson, Bernard Herman, 
Banks, Oswald Franklin, 



E. Boston, 
Waverley, 
Madison, Me. 



94 Porter St., E. Boston 

48 Agassiz Ave., Waverley 

8 Garrison St., Boston 



{Wake 



Nashville, Tenn. 79 Humboldt Ave., Rox. 
Boston, 15 Warren Ave., Boston 

E. Boston, 211 Princeton St., E. Boston 
Arlington Heights, 

131 Florence Ave., Arlington Heights 
Thorndike, Me. 58 Francis St., Rox. 

Dorchester, 208 Harvard St., Dor. 

Parlett, 0. 80 Francis St., Rox. 

Rockland, 40 Blanchard St., Rockland 

Rome, Ga. 88 Francis St., Rox. 

Brookline, 21 Cumberland Ave., B'kline 
Cambridge, 40 Inman St., Cambridge 
Dorchester, 150 Stanwood St., Dor. 

Roslindale, 876 South St., Roslindale 

Middelhurg, Transvaal, So. Africa, 

20 Francis St., Rox. 
Meriden, Conn. 6 Batavia St., Boston 
Cambridge, 118 Antrim St., Cambridge 
Carmody, Everett Raymond, Providence, R. I. 880 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Chadbourne, Bailey Paul Brackett, Dorchester, 64 Dracut St., Dor. 

Clayes, Stanley Arnold, Portland, Me. 136 Hemenway St., Boston 

Colson, Robert Willis, No. Weymouth, 48 Saunders St., No. Weymouth 



Banton, Madison Whitten, 
Bates, Francis Creber, 
Bates, William Spencer, 
Beal, Donald Fremont, 
Betts, Carl Leon, a.b. 

Forest Coll.) 1912, 
Bickford, Willis John, Jr. 
Blackler, Robert Boyd, 
Bresnick, Barnet, 
Brown, Crawford Gerard, 
Burger, David Jacob, 



Burkinshaw, Herbert Joseph, 
Cannon, Michael Leo, 



Copeland, Raymond Norman, 
Cronin, Walter Leo, 
Cummings*, Eugene Raphael, 
Danforth, John, 
Davenport, Raeburn Roundy, 



Hyde Park, 38 Davison St., Hyde Park 
Cambridge, 17 Baldwin St., Cambridge 
Fall River, 631 Middle St., Fall River 
Manchester, 640 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Beverly, 61 Lovett St., Beverly 

DeBorja, John Raymond, Ecuador, So. America, 71 Gainsboro St., Boston 
Despotes, Angello Constantine, Mattapan, 39 Deering R'd, Mattapan 
Donigan, Henry Joseph, Roxbury, 54 Reed St., Rox. 

Douglas, Rex Nye, Elkhart, Ind. 80 Browne St., B'kline 

Dulac, Leon Edward, Gardiner, Me. 11 Fenwood R'd, Rox. 

Echevarria, Angel Maria, Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic, So. America, 

316 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Edgar, John Marion, Jr. E. Sandwich, 3 Linnaean St., Cambridge 

ErkenBrack, Kenneth Beresford, Brooklyn, N. Y. 484 Brookline Ave., Boston 



87 



Garry, Hubert James, 
Godfrey, Bradford Custer, 
Gould, Louis, 
Green, Harry, 
Grosser, David, 
Haley, Russell Lowell, 
Hallen, Herbert Vincent, 
Harris, George Augustus, 
Hicks, Arthur Wellington, 
Honan, John Harold, 
Jameson, Max Lodge, 
Johnson, William Ernest, . 
Keegan, Thomas Joseph, 
Kent, Harold Albert, 
Killigrew, George Francis, 
Knight, Gerald Herbert, 
Kraslofsky, Maurice Israel, 
Lawrence, Glenn Willis, 
LeClair, Albert Powell, 
Lindgren, Homer Dorr, 
Lombard, Blake, 
Lumiansky, Barrett, 
Macfarlane, Russell Bailey, 
McLaren, Ira Josiah, 
McMeans, Van Home, 
Malone, Raymond James, 
Martin, Francis James, 
Merser, Herbert Bartlett, 



MethueUy 58 Broadway, Methuen 

Bennington, Vt. 133 Peterboro St., Boston 

Somersworth, N. H. 11 Westminster R'd, Rox. 



Southbridge, 

Bostony 

Medford, 

Maiden, 

Boston, 

Dover, N. H. 

Portland, Me. 



90 Devon St., Rox. 

339 Charles St., Boston 

83 Otis St., Medford 

30 Glen St., Maiden 

133 Peterboro St., Boston 

11 Fen wood R'd, Rox. 

11 Fenwood R*d, Boston 

Burlington, Vt. 87 St. James Ave., Boston 

Ansonia, Conn. 30 Ball St., Boston 

Ansonia, Conn. 229 Longwood Ave., Boston 

Dorchester, 32 Windermere R'd, Dor. 

New Bedford, 468 Mass. Ave., Boston 

Westhrooh, Me. 414 Mass. Ave., Boston 

Framingham, 55 Irving St., Framingham 

Exeter, N. H. 33 Mt. Vernon St., Boston 

Fall River, 34 Jamaica R'd, B'kline 

Adrian, Minn. 11 Fenwood R'd, Boston 

Dorchester, 40 Everton St., Dor. 

Dorchester, 44 Wolcott St., Dor. 

Boston, 264 Bay State R'd, Boston 

E. Boston, 238 Lexington St., E. Boston 

Davenport, la. 523 Washington St., B'kline 

Portland, Me, 880 Huntington Ave., Boston 

Newton Centre, 169 Ward St., Newton Centre 



Dorchester, 103 King St., Dor. 

Morera, Mario, Santiago, Dominican Republic, 316 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Mulcahy, John Francis, Framingham, 21 Highland St., Framingham 

Mullineaux, Charles Aiken, Ansonia, Conn. 316 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Odom, William Pearce, Gordon, Ala. 8 Batavia St., Boston 

Ostrander, Harry Moses, Keshonkson, N. Y. 66 Francis St., Rox. 

PhiUips, George Philadelpheus, 
A.B. {Anatolia Coll., Marsovan, 



Turkey) 1905, 
Pomeroy, Richard Bruce, 
Pooler, Carlton Fernald, 
Preston, Lovell Hubbard, 
Raymond, Roy York, 
Rios, Alberto de los, 



Milford, 

Gloucester, 

Brookline, 



15 Church St., Milford 

173 St. Botolph St., Boston 

34 Jamaica R'd, B'kline 

New Hampton, N. H. 66 Francis St., Rox. 

Cambridge, 5 Eustis St., Cambridge 

Salta, Argentine Republic, So. America, 

316 Huntington Ave., Boston 



88 



Rivero, Amancio Justo, 

Rosenfeld, Louis, 
Ruby, Joseph, 
Sargent, Rolla Beane, 
Sarti, Fernando, 



Scott, William Michael, 

(Bates Coll.) 1916, 
Shahinian, Vessem Kapriel, 

Steller, Hyman Boris, 



Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic, So. America, 

62 Louis Prang St., Boston 

Maiden, 29 MagnoHa St., Maiden 

New York, N. Y. 544 Mass. Ave., Boston 

Huntington Centre, Vt. 48 Wright St., Stoneham 

Guatemala City, Guatemala, Central America, 

260 Brookline Ave., Boston 

A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 880 Huntington Ave., Boston 
Providence, R. I. 

276 Smith St., Providence, R. I. 
Everett, 165a Main St., Everett 



Stone, Laurence Husted, Grand Rapids, Mich. 144 Hemenway St., Boston 



Stowers, Nathaniel, 
Swett, Norman Warren, 
Tellone, Emil Edward, 
Tierney, Joseph John, 
Trecartin, Julian Edward, 
Turner, Spurgeon de Witt, 
Wass, Russell Dickson, 
Whelan, James Ignatius, 
Wholley, Joseph Dennis, 

(Boston Coll.) 1915, 
Wolman, Benjamin Daniel, 



Jamaica Plain, 59 Seaverns Ave., Jam. PL 
Medford, 37 Ashland St., Medford 

E. Orange, N. J. 58 Francis St., Rox. 
Dorchester, 44 Pearl St., Dor. 

Lubec, Me. 34 Jamaica R'd, B'kline 

Kentville, N. S. 20 Carnes St., W. Lynn 
Leominster, 98 Hemenway St., Boston 
Dorchester, 11a Harvest St., Dor. 



A.B. 



Chelsea, 
Gardiner, Me. 



70 Grove St., Chelsea 
11 Fen wood R'd, Rox. 



SUMMARY 

Post-Graduate Student 1 

Third- YEAR Students 68 

Second- YEAR Students 76 

First- YEAR Students 94 

Total 239 



89 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



1911 

Frederick Hooke Bridgham, 

Charles Sumner Emerson, Jr., 
Byron Hinson Haley, cum laude, 
Hennan Everett Hichborn, 
Albert Charles Holzman, 
Frederick Dean Mclntyre, 
Charles Franklin Ross, 
Charles Frederick Sprague, 
Samuel Warren Stoddard, 
Leon Axtelle Storz, 
Kurt Hermann Thoma, cum laude, 
Bernard Walper, 



1912 



Earl Alexander Anderson, 
William Wilton Anthony, 
David Francis Burke, 
Thomas Francis Cloney, Jr. 
Ivan Rogers Cottrell, 
Joseph Benjamin Finberg, 
Aaron Hyman Nathan Flink, 
Nathan Solomon Friedberg, 
Adolph Gahm, 
Vincent Aloysius Gookin, 
Francis Thomas Hassett, 
Elias Hirshon, 
Joseph Horgan, 

Frederick Waldemar Hovestadt, 
William Gleason Jewett, 
Victor Paul Klapacs, 
Cedric Tremaine Lynes, 
Lawrence Edward McGourty, 
Paul Robert Manning, 
Everett Leo Noonan, 
John Clarence Normand, 
Joseph Sylvester O'Connor, 
Herbert Carroll Ober, 
Julius Simon Pos, 
Arthur Hodgkins Reed, 
Francis Porter Riggs, 



Mansfield, Wash. 

Dorchester. 

Newport, R. I. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Danvers. 

Lebanon, N. H. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Worcester. 

Boston. 

Roxbury. 

Portland, Me. 

Boston. 

Cambridge. 

New York, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 

Haverhill. 

Roxbury, 

Boston. 

Brighton. 

Dorchester. 

Great Barrington. 

Boston. 

Cambridge. 

Boston. 

Gardner. 

So. Bdlton. 

Winchester. 

Boston. 

Holyoke. 

Cambridge. 

Providence, R. I. 

Worcester. 

Cambridge. 

New York. 

Boston. 

New York. 



90 



Henry James Skinner, 

Samuel Small, 

Nishan Der Sarkis Tashjian, 

Harold Freeman Tufts, a.b. (Acadia Coll.) 1900, 

Everett Thomas Waters, 

Frederick Emory Wellington, 

Meyer Winer, 

Chester Fisher Wolfe, 

Nicholas Edward Young, 



1913 
Harold Wales Alden, 
Samuel Berry, 
David David Bloom, 
Percy Tylor Burtt, 
Berj Quarekin Chutjian, 
Abraham Kaganovsky Cohen, 
Jacob William Cushner, 
Joel Emanuel Davidson, 
Hachadoor Sarkis Emirzian, 
Merton Weston Foss, 
Thomas James Giblin, Jr., 
Ralph Edward Gove, 
Edward Martin Guthrie, 
Raymond Burns Hanrahan, 
Stuart Roberts Hayman, 
Harold Clement Hoye, 
Charles Alexander Judd, 
David Gyorgy Klein, 
Louis Kovalsky, 
William Stocks Lacey, l.d.s. {England) 

M.R.C.S., L.R.c.p. (England) 1912, 
George Holland Lappen, 
Julius Henry Levine, 
Ernest Lapham Lockwood, 
Allan Witham Lord, 
Ansel Mayo Lothrop, 
Sterling Nye Loveland, ^ 

Thomas Stephenson MacKnight, 
Thomas Edward McGreen, 
William Henry Maguire, 
Stephen Parker Mallett, 
Jean Achille Morin, 



Dorchester. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

New York, N. Y 

Winchendon. 

Salem. 

Norwood. 

Lawrence. 



Northampton. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Brockton. 
Boston. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Boston. 
Dorchester. 
Providence, R. I. 
Brockton 
Dorchester. 
Boston. 
Maiden. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Belmont. 
Danbury, Conn. 
Dorchester. 
Fall River. 
1908, 
Hertford, Herts, England. 
Dorchester. 
Roxbury. 
Providence, R. I. 
Danvers. 
Belfast, Maine. 
Boston. 
Newport, R. I. 
Providence, R. L 
Walpole. 
Boston. 
Paris, France 



91 



George Frederick Marsh, Jr., 
Horatio Cook Meriam, a.b. 1911, 
Harry Yeates Nutter, 
Harrison Lindsay Parker, 
Charles William Rawlins, 
Charles Weston Ringer, 
Joseph Henry Selib, 
John Mark Smith, 
Henry Francis Stevenson, 
Lee Forney Strickler, 
Roy Greenwood Strickler, 
Frederick Charles Thomson, 
Philip Edgar Tukey, 
Raymond Lesley Webster, 
Morton Fen ton Yates, 



Boston. 

Salem. 

Winchester. 

Boston. 

Roxbury. 

Allston. 

Boston. 

Chelsea. 

New York, N.Y. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Cambridge. 

Portland, Me. 

Providence, R. I. 

So. Framingham. 



1914 

George Nathan Abbott, 

Abraham Altshuler, 

Walter Irving Ashland, 

Benjamin Edward Bahn, 

David Samuel Bedrick, 

Tullio Nicola Bello, 

Max Besas, 

Knut Erhard Boldt-Christmas, a.b. {lAnkojping, 

Sweden) 1910, 
Edward Vincent Bowler, 
Frederick James Caldwell, 
Victor Thomas Augustine Cur tin, 
Basil Constantine Despotes, 
Pierre Stevens de Belfort Didsbury, 
Ralph Howard Drury, 
Ralph Burleigh Ed son, 
Norman EUard, 
Edward Finn, 
Harry Fishman, 
Harold Irving Fiske, 
Cecil Gray Fletcher, 
Fred Strong Frary, 
David D angel Freedman, 
John Henry Garvin, Jr., 
Charles William Goetz, 



Rockland. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Dorchester. 

Fall River. 

Boston. 

New York, N. Y. 

Halmstadt, Sweden. 

Waltham. 

Dorchester. 

Lawrence. 

Boston. 

Paris, France. 

Worcester. 

Springfield. 

Allston. 

Boston. 

Cambridge. 

Upton. 

New York, N. Y. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Boston. 

Lawrence. 

Roxbury. 



92 



Isaac Goldberg, 

Bernard Leo Higgins, 

Harry Leo Kilburn, 

Moses Hyman Lurie, 

Judson Stewart McGregor, s.b. (Acadia Coll.) 

1908, 
Harry Francis McKanna, 
George Edward Mahoney, 
Harold Woodbury George Marshall, 
Thomas William Murray, 
John Andrew Nash, 
Will Carleton Niles, 
Daniel Joseph O'Mara, 
Ivan Wallace Pasmore, l.d.s., r.c.s. {England) 

1912, 
George Porter Pendleton, 
Charles Walter Proud, 
Bene Rippen, 

Abraham George Roitman, 
Max Schneider, l.d.s., r.c.s. {England) 1912, 
Stuart Hamilton Vaughan, 
Walter Elton Wade, 
Thomas Alexander MofFatt Wilson, 
Walter Edward Young, 



Boston. 
Boston. 
Rumford, Me. 
Dorchester. 

Boston. 

Riverpoint, R. I. 

Lowell. 

Athol. 

Portland, Me. 

Dorchester. 

Watertown. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Exeter, England. 

Natick. 

Everett. 

Cambridge. 

E. Boston. 

Gorlitz, Germany. 

Melrose. 

Brookline. 

Perth, W. Australia. 

Newton Centre. 



1915 



Joseph Arthur Ahern, 
Charles Ellis Allen, 
Maxwell Leon Aronson, 
George Brickett Blaisdell, 
Fred Ralph Blumenthal, 
Cleophas Paul Bonin, 
Cyrus King Briggs, 
Ferdinand Brigham, a.b. 
Louis Nathaniel Brody, 
Thomas Dalton Brown, ph.b. 
Arthur Leo Cavanagh, 
Walter Harlow Chambers, 
Carroll Lindley Church, 
Zelman Cohen, 
John Edward Coleran, 
George Edmond Comeau, a.b. 



Boston. 

Burlington, Vt. 
Johannesburg, So. Africa. 
Pittsfield. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Portland, Me. 
So. Framingham. 
Dorchester. 
Springfield. 
Somerville. 
Somerville. 
Gardiner, Me. 
Boston. 
Dorchester. 
Lowell. 



93 



Ralph Corydon Curtis, 
Frank Holmes Cushman, b.s. 
Harold James Cutler, a.b. 
John Fletcher Dillon, 
Francis Chester Durant, 
Samuel William Garfinkle, 
Jacob Genensky, 
Jacob Helfanbein, 
Oswald William Holmes, 
John Hassan Jaffar, 
Frank Burt Johnson, 
Claude Victor Johnston, 
William Columbus Keller, 
Charles Henry King, 
Dickran Mugerdich Konjoyian, 
Herman William Kupperstein, 
Joseph Kupperstein, 
Arthm* Albert Lawry, 
Frank Herbert Leslie, 
Chauncey Nye Lewis, 
Simon DeSalles McCarty, 
Arthm* Benedict McCormick, a.b. 
Edward Aloysius Mahoney, 
Gabriel Melvin Mendelsohn, 
Edward Russell Miu*phy, 
Gustave Henry Oetiker, 
Herman Ashton Osgood, a.b. 
James Howard Reed, 
Habib Y<isuf Rih^n, a.b., 
Barnard Sagall, 
Charles Berry Sawyer, 
Samuel Vaughan Selby, l.d.s., 
Samuel Saul Sharfman, 
Charles Joseph Smith, 
Roy Brackett Stevens, 
Francis Joseph Terra, 
Elmer Russell Treadwell, 
Jan Frederik Vercueil, 
EUmore Loftis Wallace, 
Barnet Maurice Wein, 
Ray Owen Worthen, 
Max Yavner, 



Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Dorchester. 
Boston. 

Hartford, Conn. 
New Bedford. 
Fall River. 
Winthrop. 
Boston. 

Pawtucket, R. I. 
Providence, R. I. 
Flushing, L.L,N.Y. 
Bangor, Me. 
Worcester. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Valdosta, Ga. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Waltham. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Winchester. 
Switzerland. 
Roxbury. 
New York. N. Y. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Lynn. 

Sydney, Australia. 
Boston. 

Providence, R. I. 
Waltham. 
Dorchester. 
Lynn. 
Middelburg, Transvaal, So. Africa. 
Brockton. 
Roxbury. 
Barre, Vt. 
Boston. 



94 



1916 

Hygus Adams, 
Samuel Edward Ansel, 
Claude Vincent Barrett, 
Frederick Floron Bates, 
James Bell, 
John Edward Boland, 
Arthur George Buehler, 
Harold Howard Buehler, 
Daniel Henry Burke, Jr., 
Frank Thomas Burke, 
Lewis Osgood Card, 
Charles Russell Carroll, 
Thomas Francis Dempsey, 
Michael Thomas Fenton, 
Joseph Paul Fleming, Jr., 
Charles Arthur Forbush, 
Wilfred Joy Fuller, 
Frederick Francis Furfey, 
Frank Herbert Galloway, 
Raymond Walker Gatchell, 
Philip Goldberg, 
Harry Goldinger, 
Julius Benjamin Goldsmith, 
Homer Robinson Gray, 
William Harry GuUifer, 
Everett Clayton Ham, 
Melville Winslow Haynes, 
Arthur Adolf Paul Held, 
Ray King Hodgkins, 
Philip Hutchinson Maclnnis, 
Augustus Anthony McKenna, 
Edward Patrick Henry Morrissey, 
Russell Lee Newling, 
Owen Roe O'Neil, 
Harold Lee Peacock, 
Frederick Gunner Pierce, 
Jacob Pof cher, 
Fred Seavey Powers, 
Wentworth Baldwin Prentice, 
Chester Leigh Sandiford, 
Jacob Seidenberg, 



Cambridge. 
Roxbury. 
Milo, Me. 
Brighton. 
Lawrence. 
Northampton. 
Brookline. 
Brookline. 
Scituate Harbor. 
Brockton. 
Somerville. 
Roslindale. 
Quincy. 

Hartford, Conn. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Somerville. 
Brookline. 
Lawrence. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
East Boston. 
East Boston. 
Newport, R. I. 
Uxbridge. 
Boston. 
Somerville. 
Dorchester. 
Danbury, Conn. 
Bar Harbor, Me. 
Boston. 
Fall River. 
Dorchester. 
Canton. 
Belfast, Transvaal, So. Africa. 
Boston. 
Worcester. 
Roxbury. 
Deer Isle, Me. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
Chelsea, 



95 



Clarence Geddes Severy, 
William Sissenwine, 
Walter James Sly, 
Byron Nelson Harris Smith, 
Homer Charles Sowles, 
Benjamin Strout Stevens, 
Farnum Charles Stevens, 
Harold Lincoln Stover, 
Clifford Strange, 
Max Harold Summerfield, 
William Ranson Thompson, 
Maurice John Tierney, Jr., 
Laurence Starrett White, 
Charles Rollin Williams, 



Boston. 

Dorchester. 

Salem. 

Lakewood, R. I. 

Boston. 

Brockton. 

Derry, N. H. 

Fall River. 

Portland, Me. 

Boston. 

Lowell, 

Dorchester, 

Boston. 

Salem. 



/ 



OFFICIAL REGISTER OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

lEntered March 6, 1913^ at Boston ^ Mass., as second-class matter, 
undc Act of Congress of August 24, 1912.] 




Issued at Cambridge Station, Boston, Mass., three times each, 
in January, February, July, August, and September ; eight 
times each, in March, April, May, and June ; twice each, in 
October, November, and December. 



These publications include : — 

The Annual Reports of the President and of the Treasurer. 

The Annual University Catalogue. 

The Annual Catalogues of the College and the eeveral Pro- 
fessional Schools of the University ; the Descriptive Pam- 
phlet ; the Announcements of the several Departments ; 
eic.j eiic.